[ 3 / a / adv / an / asp / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / g / gd / int / jp / k / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / o / out / p / po / sci / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wsg / x]

/an/ - Animals & Nature

<< back to board
[Delete this thread]

Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)14:40 UTC+1 No.1678045 Report

I'm a little bitch who's scared of dogs. How can I get better?

I'm not very big but reasonably fit. If pressed, I could probably put up a desperate fight with an average mutt (though probably not a dog bred for fighting like pic related) but I would really, really like to avoid it because the dog doesn't have much to lose, but even a few scratches on me means I'm risking disease.

I tried to force myself to not show I'm scared, but it doesn't really work because when the dog starts barking I jump or flinch and get an adrenaline rush, and fight or flight kicks in.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)14:44 UTC+1 No.1678047 Report

>>1678045
>I'm not very big but reasonably fit. If pressed, I could probably put up a desperate fight with an average mutt (though probably not a dog bred for fighting like pic related) but I would really, really like to avoid it because the dog doesn't have much to lose, but even a few scratches on me means I'm risking disease.

By putting this as part of your post, I can see that you basically conjure events in your head, situations where you end up fighting a dog. Seems like borderline phobic or post-traumatic behavior. Were you bitten by a dog when you were younger?

The first step is to realize that these things probably aren't going to happen ever in your life again. So you don't need to think about how well you could take a dog in a fight, you need to not be thinking about that at all. I can't help you beyond that point, it sounds like therapy would help a lot.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)14:45 UTC+1 No.1678048 Report

>go to a nice dog
>get treat
>give dog treat
>let it eat it
>grab another treat and rub it on your hand so it smell like treat
>put hand inside dog mouth
>see how it gets confused, but it wont chew on hand

stop beign a bitch, i was mauled by a chow chow as a kid
dogs are friends
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)14:58 UTC+1 No.1678054 Report

>>1678047
>Were you bitten by a dog
No.

>these things probably aren't going to happen
Well, let's say I'm out walking somewhere without anyone around. Suddenly a dog runs over to me and starts barking. Supposedly, if I just run away I'll provoke it, so what do I do? Just walk away? Won't that be the same thing as running, except worse?
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:02 UTC+1 No.1678055 Report

What's helped my somewhat with my fear of horses is learning their body language. I figure /most/ animal attacks don't happen without any kind of warning before hand. So if I know the body language of the animal I can figure out when I'm pissing it off, or if it's showing signs of aggression. Then I know when to back the hell off.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:03 UTC+1 No.1678056 Report

>>1678045
As someone who's a bit of a savant with dogs and even aggressive ones seem to love me, I can maybe give you a few tips.

First, dogs are highly attuned to human emotions and can read body language better than we can. So when you're feeling scared and on edge around them, they pick up on that pretty quickly and are far more likely to be aggressive back.

When I meet a dog, I treat it much like I would a human. I make eye contact with it, smile and say "hi!" Then I crouch down a little so we're more on the same level and usually they come over for a pat or a lick. Really, it's just about bringing the energy you want to the encounter.

The best way for you to do this, if you really want to is to get in contact with a friend who has a dog you know is generally pretty relaxed and friendly. Then just spend some time with it. You need to get over the hurdle of being scared by them first and that's a great way. Just spend time with it until it starts to sink into your brain that this isn't a predator waiting to eat you the moment you turn around, it's another social creature who wants you to relax as much as you want it to.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:06 UTC+1 No.1678057 Report

>>1678054
Best thing to do is just stand your ground and smile. If you run, the dog will think you're playing with it. Most dogs barking is just them saying hello really loudly. Just stand there and say hello back to it.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:06 UTC+1 No.1678058 Report

>>1678054
>Well, let's say I'm out walking somewhere without anyone around. Suddenly a dog runs over to me and starts barking. Supposedly, if I just run away I'll provoke it, so what do I do? Just walk away? Won't that be the same thing as running, except worse?

Back up. Don't turn your back to the dog at any point. Don't make eye contact, but keep an eye on it. Don't yell at it, don't try to kick it or anything. That'll only provoke it. You want the dog to realize you're not a threat.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:18 UTC+1 No.1678059 Report

>>1678058
I agree with this except the no eye contact thing. In my experience dogs react far better to you when you make eye contact in a friendly way. When they look in your eyes and see you're chill, they chill out pretty quickly too.

When a strange dog runs up to me and starts barking, I literally talk to them like they're people having a conversation with me.

>Woof woof woof!!!!
Hey there!
>Rawr wooof!
You've sure got a nice coat! What's your name?
>Wooof woof yip!
Cool! I have dogs too, you want to sniff my hand?

Might sound ridiculous, but it really works.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:33 UTC+1 No.1678064 Report

>>1678056
>When I meet a dog, I treat it much like I would a human. I make eye contact with it, smile and say "hi!" Then I crouch down a little so we're more on the same level and usually they come over for a pat or a lick. Really, it's just about bringing the energy you want to the encounter.

Don't listen to this guy, OP. Especially concerning eye contact, holy fuck.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:34 UTC+1 No.1678066 Report

>>1678059
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:40 UTC+1 No.1678069 Report

>>1678054
Stay calm and let them assess you.

Most of the time when they run up to you barking its more of a "stop, who are you?"
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)15:46 UTC+1 No.1678070 Report

>>1678064
>>1678066
My whole life of experience with dogs says otherwise. Do make eye contact with every dog I encounter and have never been attacked or bitten and often get comments like "ohh he usually doesn't like anyone" or "don't worry, he always barks" just before the dogs calms down and starts licking me.

Source: a life of living with dogs and hundreds of trips to dog parks. They're social and they like it when you are too.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)17:26 UTC+1 No.1678093 Report

OP isn't a little bitch for being afraid of an overly defensive animal that doesn't understand humans anywhere near as well as dog owners kid themselves into believing and causes more injuries than any other vertebrate on the planet.

Just carry a small knife wherever you go and hope you can pull it out in time
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)17:39 UTC+1 No.1678095 Report

>>1678093
>Just carry a small knife wherever you go and hope you can pull it out in time

Wow... You sure you're on the right forum?
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:11 UTC+1 No.1678100 Report

>>1678095
what is it like being such a gigantic faggot pussy that the concept of defending oneself is offensive?
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:16 UTC+1 No.1678103 Report

>>1678056
do not make eye contact. That is dominance. Do not lower yourself to the ground, just stand still. Jesus.

Dogs make eye contact (stare down) as a dominance to see who will look away first.

If neither dog looks away this can trigger a fight.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:19 UTC+1 No.1678105 Report

>>1678100
What's it like being so scared of a fucking dog that you have to carry a knife around with you? And you're calling me a pussy? Ohh that's rich.

Dogs can be aggressive sure, but they're not super complex and are easy to understand and deal with if you know how.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:20 UTC+1 No.1678106 Report

>>1678069
But what about if I freeze in place, and the dog keeps looking at me and barking?

If I'm lucky, someone will eventually hear and come over, but who knows how long I will have to wait like that.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:22 UTC+1 No.1678107 Report

>>1678103
Again, I've been living with and dealing with dogs for over 30 years now. I go to leash free parks nearly every weekend and have interacted with thousands and thousands of them. The "don't make eye contact or they'll attack you" thing is bullshit.

Yes, if you make angry eye contact with one or try to stare it down you'll get in a fight. But eye contact and a smile makes virtually every dog friendly. Aggressive barking can turn to hand licking in no time at all.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:22 UTC+1 No.1678108 Report

>walking my small, shy dog
>have his leash wrapped around my hand several times so it's extremely short
>just taking him out to smell the smells, not for interaction
>woman and her bf walk by me on the sidewalk
>woman JUMPS BACK when he sees my dog and yells that she's AFRAID OF DOGS!!!
>dog has his tail between his legs and is cowering away from her from the noise

I'm not saying that OP sounds like this but I just thought that was so fucking stupid. Like, face your fear, realize that most dogs aren't going to bite you, bitch you're in your 40's.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:28 UTC+1 No.1678109 Report

>>1678106
Most places dogs aren't allowed off leash. If the owner isn't obeying the rules, they should still be at least within earshot and there to control their dog in less than a minute.

In the event it does take them longer to get to you, just wait. If you have a phone, then call the local animal authority or police. If not, tell the owner when they arrive that you are reporting them and then do so.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:41 UTC+1 No.1678119 Report

>>1678109
And stray dogs?
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:45 UTC+1 No.1678120 Report

>>1678055
Can you give me a few tips? I clean the whole horse thing as a little extra income. I'm there five days a week and figured the 2nd basics (the stuff that goes further than rational basics everyone should know, but pretty much anyone who isn't too dumb would realise. For example one thump is just something like "hey, this place is kinda taken, but if I don't have a really bad day we can chill". I used to be afraid of horses when I was younger, but just kinda working at their side is pretty chill and helped me a lot more.

>tl;dr: Can you give me some tips about their actual body language, apart from behaviour related things. Like ear position etc.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:49 UTC+1 No.1678123 Report

>>1678107

eye contact show teeth. doesn't sound at all like another dog baring its teeth, staring down.

open mouth eye contact. open mouth= relaxed. i can see your point there.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)18:53 UTC+1 No.1678124 Report

>>1678059
Not sure about this, but I picked up somewhere that dogs can hear your "moot" or whatever by the sound of your voice, might only be the volume though.

Anyway, I do talk to dogs and really calm way but try to keep my voice natural so it doesn't freak out if I suddenly say something louder. They definetly are more likely to relax faster if you just say hi to them in a friendly, calm way. Sounds are a way to communicate and the dog will get a friendly first impression instead of someone just freezing and not saying anything. I don't think I'll even have to point out yelling, thats just stupid.
>>
Anonymous 07/17/14(Thu)19:10 UTC+1 No.1678126 Report

>>1678105
if you have the means of defending yourself you don't have to be scared of anything.

Not all dogs are going to be friendly and understanding, there will be dogs that are raised improperly and are just bad dogs, there will be dogs that will attack someone and if that someone is you, i guess you'll just sit there and take it. Chances are most people will never have to deal with such a hypothetical situation as a dgo attacking them.

however, there is nothing wrong with being prepared. Especially when it involves your life and well being.
>>
Anonymous 07/18/14(Fri)02:27 UTC+1 No.1678368 Report

>>1678045
start learning dog behavior. "familiarity breeds contempt" or however it went. the more you understand how to read the dog language, the less they will be scary to you, because their behavior will be familiar and easy to understand.
>>
Anonymous 07/18/14(Fri)02:58 UTC+1 No.1678389 Report

>>1678120
Sounds like you already probably know more than I do about it. For me it was hard figuring out the difference between them listening behind themselves and when their ears are back because they're pissed. Stomping is another one I noticed, just a mildly annoyed action. Them picking up one hind foot is another (I think?) If I remember correctly as well, chewing with no food in their mouth/lip smacking is also a sign of stress?

It's kind of silly really. Horses are supposed to be one of man's best friends, and I think they're gorgeous. But they just scare the crap outa me. I'm slowly getting over it I'm fine with them so long as there's a fence between us. My access to horses is limited and that's not really helping. Probably because my grandparents raise them, but I get along much better with cows. It's kinda silly.
>>
Anonymous 07/18/14(Fri)03:08 UTC+1 No.1678390 Report

i think i heard somewhere that dogs dont fight to the death, only til they are hurt. so by that logic one well placed kick will stop a dog from attacking you. so i wouldnt be too woried unless it had rabies or some shit, however i dont know if most dog attacks on full sized adults happen because of rabies.
>>
Anonymous 07/18/14(Fri)07:38 UTC+1 No.1678492 Report

>>1678389
I noticed this chewing thing a few times, but it was always the same horse. I work with 7 of them, two are ponies, the rest is pretty big. The thing is that I can'z really tell what exactly they're reacting to in that specific situation.
For example, I know they hate being outside when the weather is too hot, only because of those big bloodsucking flies (forgot the Emglish name, my bad).
Never had a real problem with them though, they let me just clean around and under them with out really giving a fuck.

I just get nervous sometimes when I see them handling each other, cuz they can get quite rough if they had a bad day. They are really well trained btw, not a single major injury caused by them so far, they sometimes just kick the shit out of each other qhen no ones watching.

Really helps having them run up to you when you open up the field for them and they just charge there mad.
If you treat them right, you really don't need to be afraid. Pretty much just like most animals.
>>
Anonymous 07/18/14(Fri)07:42 UTC+1 No.1678496 Report

>>1678390
The rabbies cases are probably strays that picked it up from other animals for the most part. Here in Germany our rabbies nummer one is the fox if I'm not mistaken.

I also recognized that there are far more foxea here now than we had a couple years good. Shouldn't happen too often in "higher developed" countries, since the stray dog number especially in the rural areas is quite low
>>
Anonymous 07/18/14(Fri)07:51 UTC+1 No.1678498 Report

>>1678496
Sorry for the mass of mistakes, fingers are too fat for the phone.
All the content on this website comes from 4chan.org. All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster. 4chanArchive is not affiliated with 4chan.