[ 3 / a / adv / an / asp / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / g / gd / int / jp / k / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / o / out / p / po / sci / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wsg / x]

/asp/ - Alternative Sports

<< back to board
[Delete this thread]

File: We39hG1392659271.jpg-(147 KB, 500x625)
/asp/How do you deal with...
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:07 UTC+1 No.333210 Report

/asp/

How do you deal with defeat?

After months of training, I lost for a second time in a Jiu Jitsu tournament. It just feels like no matter what I do, I always lose.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:18 UTC+1 No.333211 Report

There is no such thing as losing in Jiu-Jitsu.

You either win or you learn.

Hue
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:27 UTC+1 No.333214 Report

>>333211
Then why does "learning" make me feel like shit?
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:35 UTC+1 No.333215 Report

>>333214

Ego
>>
BJJfag 03/01/14(Sat)14:36 UTC+1 No.333217 Report

>>333214
dint know what to tell you mang, its just a tournament, its not a big deal.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:40 UTC+1 No.333219 Report

>>333215
That is not it. Its frustrating that even after all the hours I clocked in, I still don't seem to be improving as fast as my peers.

Im I just a lost cause /asp/?
>>333217
Well it was in front of lots of people and photographers from Jiu Jitsu Magazine were there, so it kinda was a big deal. I'd hate for my friends to find me in a page getting my ass kicked.
>>
AK 03/01/14(Sat)14:44 UTC+1 No.333221 Report

You understand that there's no reason to get upset over losing or rolling with a guy who's constantly making you tap when you realise there are a huge number of people better than you.

If you lose, the chances are that your opponent was better than you. Just aim for the small wins first, such as preventing certain submissions, getting to a favourable position and when rolling in your gym, getting certain submissions to work at all. No reason to get upset because you lost. You're bound to lose, many, many, many times.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:55 UTC+1 No.333223 Report

>>333219
>I still don't seem to be improving as fast as my peers.

Don't worry about anyone else man. Training is for you. Are you better than you were before? Everyone is different and will pick up certain skills at different paces. Take notice of smaller improvements or set goals for small wins like gaining a dominant position or escaping a submission. Challenge yourself, keep improving, and don't worry about anyone else.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)14:57 UTC+1 No.333224 Report

You sound like you forgot to leave your ego at the door. It's a cliche but it's totally true about BJJ.

Don't focus on winning, focus on what technical aspects of your game need improving and make sure you are applying yourself to improving technique in training, not just trying to "beat" your team-mates.
>>
BJJfag 03/01/14(Sat)16:36 UTC+1 No.333244 Report

>>333219
>ego
>That is not it. Its frustrating that even after all the hours I clocked in, I still don't seem to be improving as fast as my peers.
>its not ego
>im unhappy because im not better than other people
dunno mang, sounds like an ego issue to me.

i mean unless you want to go pro, in which case just train more
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)17:17 UTC+1 No.333256 Report

>>333224
>>333244
You guys call it ego, but I disagree.
No one goes to a tournament simply to improve their technique. It is too late for training then. People go to tournaments to win.

The point of tournaments is to see how better you are than other people, correct? If I wanted to focus on improving my skills more, I would have sat this one out and trained for a while longer until the next one.

Sorry if I come off as a whiny sore loser, but its just how I feel.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)17:23 UTC+1 No.333257 Report

>>333256
Many people just see a tournament as an opportunity to test themselves.
>>
????? 03/01/14(Sat)17:25 UTC+1 No.333258 Report

>>333256
People also go to test themselves. You are indeed suffering from bruised ego this is not a "you see it your way" issue.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)17:35 UTC+1 No.333260 Report
File: slightly unamused.jpg-(125x93)
>>333257>Many people...
>>333257
>Many people just see a tournament as an opportunity to test themselves.
I had that in mind too once I entered. Lets just say it was a shamfur dispray....

>>333258
Well....I guess I can't help but feel like this. At least for a little while. I'll most likely get over it and return back to train, but it sucks.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)17:35 UTC+1 No.333261 Report

>>333210
The journey is not about the results. It's about...the journey. Learn to embrace it.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)17:40 UTC+1 No.333262 Report

>>333260
>I had that in mind too once I entered. Lets just say it was a shamfur dispray...

Well, you have been tested and now you know of some areas in which you can improve. Learn from it, keep improving, and come back stronger.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)18:57 UTC+1 No.333297 Report

Yeah, i feel that way when i play Street Fighter 4 online OP. Theres always someone better than you, that started at a younger age than you, has more money to dump into it than you and probably wants it more than you.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)19:01 UTC+1 No.333299 Report
File: 1392252524109.jpg-(125x94)
>>333210As my teacher...
>>333210

As my teacher once said:

"When I fought, I never cared about the times I won a fight, there was nothing to learn for me.
But I cared about losing, because every time I lost, I made mistakes. And this gave me the chance to analyze my mistakes, to grow and to get better."
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)19:08 UTC+1 No.333303 Report

>>333210
>How do you deal with defeat?

>reflect
>write down what seems to be muh problems
>try to improve
>>
[Insulting Style Comment] 03/01/14(Sat)19:17 UTC+1 No.333312 Report

>>333210
I'm a bad loser, always have been. I tend to get angry, usually at myself, and I tend to obsess over what went wrong until i've fixed it.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)19:19 UTC+1 No.333314 Report

>>333210
>How do you deal with defeat?

>what moves did he get me with
>how do i defend/counter those moves
>drill drill drill
>compete again
>goto step 1
>>
BJJfag 03/01/14(Sat)19:33 UTC+1 No.333318 Report

>>333256
well thats just the thing, you went there and tested yourself, now you know where you stand.there is no need to feel sad about it.

as i said, maybe you want to go pro, in which case you need a ton of motivation and other resources.
but if youre just training normally and are sad youre not progressing as fast as other guys? man thats no big deal some people just take a bit longer to learn. and when you lose you can also analyze what went wrong and improve dramatically.

dont be so down on yourself, just train until the next tourney and focus on improving yourself
>>
?????? ????? 03/01/14(Sat)20:21 UTC+1 No.333376 Report

It happens, bro. We all wanted to be the big prodigy youth that never lost a match since he started competing, but the truth is, losing happens to everyone. It's depressing as shit and makes you feel like your preparation was for nothing, but in reality nothing could be further from the truth.

Competing takes a completely different mindset from practicing or sparring at the gym; even if you're the best guy at home, someone who keeps a cooler head will still beat you and it's only normal until you get used to the anxiety of competition -- almost as if keeping a cool head in front of an audience was a discipline in itself in terms of martial arts competitions, so little by little you'll aclimatize.

Also, remember that it's better to be beat and put up a fight against someone that is technically superior than you, than it is to beat someone inferior. And that's literally how competition works; the capital T Truth is that you're there to put everything you have and it may make you feel like shit but sometimes everything you have is not enough to beat everything the other guy has, and losing is absolutely natural.

Remember that we practice and compete so that we may lose safely, instead of picking fights with stronger people and being beat up.

Keep practicing, keep giving it your all, and eventually you'll start winning. That's the way it happened to me, and it looked every bit as bleak and hopeless as I assume it's looking to you right now.

Don't give up lil' buddy
>>
TKDbrah 03/01/14(Sat)21:37 UTC+1 No.333431 Report

>>333376
hey cambo

how do you deal with overtraining? any secrets?

>>333210
OP, i've had roughly 100 matches in tkd. i've won about 80% of them.

every time i win, i don't know what to do

every time i lose i know exactly what i have to improve

enjoy the ride
>>
?????? ????? 03/01/14(Sat)22:04 UTC+1 No.333446 Report

>>333431
Consider that overtraining is not something that happens from one day to the next; you have to greatly surpass the maximum load your body can take for a long time to even start feeling the symptoms of overtraining. Chances are, whatever you're doing isn't putting your body through overtraining.

I do like to live a relaxed life, eat well, rest well and the ocassional massage or sauna trip to release tension and loosen joints. All together, not being under constant stress greatly aids recovery.
>>
TKDbrah 03/01/14(Sat)22:12 UTC+1 No.333448 Report

>>333446
hmm...could i be mistaking psychological symptoms of stress for overtraining?

oh, and what shinguards do you use for kick?
>>
?????? ????? 03/01/14(Sat)22:17 UTC+1 No.333450 Report

>>333448
Not only possible, but also very likely.

Everlast MMA shinguards. Low quality materials but excellent design and comfort. Not very durable.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)22:17 UTC+1 No.333451 Report

>>333260
I'll tell you a little something. A bit less than a year ago, a friend of mine lost his first match in a local tournament. He felt bad - and I mean really bad. But instead of posting on an internet board, he started training like mad.

A few months ago, he won his division at NAGA Paris, and today he took bronze at the IBJJF Munich Open, narrowly losing to the guy who took gold.
>>
TKDbrah 03/01/14(Sat)22:19 UTC+1 No.333453 Report

>>333450
even with injuries that arn't healing?

also, hmm...i was thinking top king

i need something with instep protection
>>
?????? ????? 03/01/14(Sat)22:21 UTC+1 No.333455 Report

>>333453
Everlast's MMA shinguards do have instep protections; but the best thing you could ask for in terms of protecting your instep is not kicking with the instep in the first place.
>>
TKDbrah 03/01/14(Sat)22:29 UTC+1 No.333462 Report

>>333455
but i've nailed people in the jaw with no real problem so far, and that's just with light tkd cloth shinstep guards

also, i've noticed it's harder to catch insteps to the body then shins
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)22:59 UTC+1 No.333468 Report

>>333446
>you have to greatly surpass the maximum load your body can take for a long time to even start feeling the symptoms of overtraining.
Absolute bullshit.
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)23:00 UTC+1 No.333469 Report

>>333219
You're training too much.

>even after all the hours I clocked in, I still don't seem to be improving as fast as my peers.
They're better than you because they take it easy.
>>
TKDbrah 03/01/14(Sat)23:15 UTC+1 No.333472 Report

>>333468
honesty, iirc, cambo's a acadamia nut, so what's your source?

just curious, i want to get to the root of my problem
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)23:40 UTC+1 No.333497 Report

>>333431
overtraining happens when you don't give your muscles enough recovery time. they're not fully healed by the time you work out next, it jsut spirals down from their
>>
Anonymous 03/01/14(Sat)23:40 UTC+1 No.333498 Report

>>333453
I have top king shin guards. They're great quality and absorb a lot (but not too much) impact. But don't even think about using them for anything other than stand up, they're quite bulky.

They also come up pretty small, i had to sell my first pair because they were too small.
>>
?????? ????? 03/01/14(Sat)23:50 UTC+1 No.333514 Report

>>333468
>>333472
Abstract:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15571428
Concrete:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1752709
>>
Anonymous 03/02/14(Sun)00:39 UTC+1 No.333552 Report

>>333210
gitgud
>>
Anonymous 03/02/14(Sun)00:45 UTC+1 No.333562 Report

>>333211
what this guy says. my boxing coach will pit me and his other students against anyone just so we get the experience, even if we don't stand a chance. we always walk away better and more experienced fighters, even when we get beat into a pulp. just let go of your ego and realize that you are not the greatest in the world.
>>
Anonymous 03/02/14(Sun)01:21 UTC+1 No.333603 Report

>>333210
By tuning out and asking the right people. They'll tell you what you need to do, and then you'll work on it.

You don't really learn from your mistakes unless you're bretty experienced. So you must ask and drill to success.
>>
Tatsumaki 03/02/14(Sun)02:04 UTC+1 No.333630 Report

Think about your match, and think about the mistakes you did.
I every time i lose a match i star to train myself more motivated than before
All the content on this website comes from 4chan.org. All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster. 4chanArchive is not affiliated with 4chan.