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File: 10286766_880502255299215_8541891274146649127_o.jpg-(229 KB, 1200x1200)
Embroidery?I've been...
Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)15:20 UTC+1 No.7605365 Report

Embroidery?
I've been aching to make a costume with some embroidery for awhile now and I'm having a hard time stumbling across things that would actually look better embroidered.
Lulu from FF, and Ahri from LoL are really the only things that come to mind.

General Embroidery Thread!
>>
Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)16:20 UTC+1 No.7605412 Report

If you want a challenge, the embroidery on Game of Thrones costumes is insane.

http://www.michelecarragherembroidery.com/Game-of-Thrones-Gallery(2829575).htm
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)17:40 UTC+1 No.7605500 Report

the patterns along the bottom of zelda's dress and on her gloves in twilight princess look amazing when they're embroidered.
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Milkie 06/08/14(Sun)17:46 UTC+1 No.7605506 Report

im pretty new to embroidery (I do it casually now and then for fun) But I wanted to embroider a teeshirt with band logos and names and such, because the bands I like have virtually no merch
But, I had a few problems and questions, wondering if anyone would be willing to help me out?
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)17:46 UTC+1 No.7605507 Report

>>7605412
it is one of the most underrated parts of the show. daxos' freaking scarab beetles were embroidered.
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)17:47 UTC+1 No.7605509 Report

>>7605412
I was thinking about it, but I don't really look close enough to any of the characters for me pull it off.

>>7605500
Holy shit, anon. How did I miss that? Thanks so much!
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)17:50 UTC+1 No.7605514 Report

I have never done embroidery before, where to start? does anyone have some good tutorials?
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)17:52 UTC+1 No.7605516 Report

>>7605514
http://www.instructables.com/id/Embroidery-101/

This helped me a bit when I was starting. Other than that, just googling youtube shit.
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)18:20 UTC+1 No.7605546 Report

>>7605516
thanks!
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)18:20 UTC+1 No.7605547 Report

>>7605514

There are a lot of different techniques and styles, so it kind of depends on the application and the look you're going for.

I've been reading this lady's blog for a bit now and while it's probably a little advanced for a beginner, she covers a pretty wide range of styles and has some nice tutorials too: http://www.needlenthread.com
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)18:58 UTC+1 No.7605601 Report

On the game of thrones site she mentions that she first embroideries on some organza, then cuts out the embroidery and stitches and glues it on top of the fabric
when is it recommended to use this method and when to embroide on the fabric itself?

and what are the pros and cons of machine embroidery and hand embroidery?
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)19:26 UTC+1 No.7605645 Report

>>7605601
machine embroidery is fast as hell, but it's typically just satin stitching. again, great if you need large areas filled in, or specific consistency/uniformity. hand embroidery is great for minor details, or where you're playing with different stitches and forms of embroidery.
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)19:29 UTC+1 No.7605649 Report

>>7605601

Applique is usually more practical for more delicate pieces that you'd want to attach to a finished garment vs. embroidering first and then building the garment. Or when it needs to go in an area that would be difficult to access on the finished piece (for example, you could embroider a hem on a skirt pretty easily after the skirt was constructed, but doing things on shoulders/collars/etc would be a lot harder).

Anyway, there are a lot of different things to consider and there's not any strict rule about it, you just have to consider the application and the technique you want to use.
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)19:58 UTC+1 No.7605704 Report

>>7605645
>>7605649
thank you

and is there a big difference between doing embroidery with a sewing machine or an embroidery machine?
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)20:49 UTC+1 No.7605804 Report

One thing you can try is called free hand machine embroidery or free motion quilting. It doesn't require a special sewing machine, just some practice. There are a lot of tutorials on youtube for it, but the results with practice look very nice. The designs on a dress like >>7605500 would be perfect for it.

Another thing to consider is called tambour embroidery/beading. It is used in couture clothing and how designs like >>7605412 are done. Again, go to youtube for tutorials. It requires a frame and special hook, but a search shows kits starting around 20-40$ so it's not too bad to start up.
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)20:54 UTC+1 No.7605812 Report

>>7605804

The GoT stuff isn't tambour embroidery. Tambour is kind of like crochet (you're pulling loops through loops, just with fabric in between).
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)21:10 UTC+1 No.7605836 Report

>>7605812
Do you happen to know how it was done?
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)21:19 UTC+1 No.7605842 Report

>>7605836

The GoT stuff? It looks like she uses a combination of different hand embroidery techniques. There might be some tambour work mixed in, but it's definitely not the primary technique. It's kind of difficult to say specifically since her pieces are really layered and the finished products are usually covered in beading (and the progress shots on her website are very tiny).
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)21:37 UTC+1 No.7605869 Report

>>7605842
http://www.michelecarragherembroidery.com/Cersei-New-Embroidery-Gallery(2880138).htm

I looked into the website a bit and apparently she used a technique called stumpwork. Google says batting or felt is sew down in layers and then embroidered over. Seems kind of obvious now that I think about it but I learned something new.
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Anonymous 06/08/14(Sun)22:19 UTC+1 No.7605921 Report

>>7605869

Yeah. Though, stumpwork is sort of just a component type thing? Like, you could do any number of types of embroidery stitches/techniques with the stumpwork padding. A lot of goldwork is done with padding too for example.
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)14:59 UTC+1 No.7610697 Report

its a bitch, thats what
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)20:01 UTC+1 No.7611088 Report

>>7605506
someone please help me with this
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)21:33 UTC+1 No.7611237 Report

Sage for no contriboot, but this thread is so great. Embroidery boners galore. Thanks for all the links and information!
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)22:17 UTC+1 No.7611294 Report

>>7611088
We can't help you if you don't ask a question, dude.
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)22:29 UTC+1 No.7611326 Report

>>7605514
I bought an embroidery handbook from a bookstore which has a load of interesting stitches in it! I really want a machine though as while handstitching is really relaxing, machines will be much faster
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)22:32 UTC+1 No.7611334 Report

>>7611294
Sorry, I thought I had
Question: I want to embroider a teeshirt, and I was worried about tension and puckering issues. Is there a way to avoid that when embroidering on thin and stretchy fabric, or should I just give up on the idea?
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)22:50 UTC+1 No.7611368 Report

>>7611334
You interface it. You can either use a fusible interfacing on the back, or if you want to take the interfacing off after, you use a temporary fabric adhesive and a tearaway interfacing. After your interfacing is attached, put on the hoop and embroider away.
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)22:54 UTC+1 No.7611376 Report

>>7611368
Thank you! I was also wondering what a good stitch was to use for medium sized lettering. I'm a fan of split stitch (i hope thats the proper name) because it looks so nice and delicate, but its a bit too thin. Im not a fan of satin stitch, but I feel like its the best choice. What do you think?
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)23:16 UTC+1 No.7611423 Report

>>7611376
You could also do a fill with a chain stitch instead of a satin stitch.
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Anonymous 06/11/14(Wed)23:26 UTC+1 No.7611439 Report

>>7611423
Thats a good idea. Ahh, this is going to take forever...
Thank you for your help!
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)03:14 UTC+1 No.7611760 Report

I'm going to making an Elizabeth Swann pirate king cosplay, and I was wondering what kind of stitch would be best for for it/how the original is done? Would it be like a split stitch or something?
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)03:38 UTC+1 No.7611790 Report

>>7611760

Do you have any closer shots? It's hard to tell.
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)03:48 UTC+1 No.7611813 Report

>>7611790
Even the high res pics I've been able to find aren't great in terms of being able to see the stitches clearly, unfortunately.
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)03:50 UTC+1 No.7611815 Report

>>7611790
And another one (which is a bit shadowed).
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)03:55 UTC+1 No.7611820 Report

>>7611813

It kinda looks almost like a couched thread of some sort to me (like, you use a thicker/heavier thread and sew it down to the garment with a thinner thread rather than embroidering the thread itself).
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)04:08 UTC+1 No.7611841 Report

>>7611820
I was thinking about doing that actually, but was worried about what to use/finding the right colour (I was thinking about a thin cord but couldn't find anything suitable so far). I didn't know that term, so thank you for helping, searching for 'couched thread' will give me a better idea of what to get. The spiral/circle designs look very similar to stuff I'm picking up on google now.
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)04:20 UTC+1 No.7611863 Report

>>7611841

I'm on a goldwork kick so I might just have goldwork vision at the moment, but you might consider goldwork passing threads. There's a less expensive, non-tarnish option called 'japanese thread' (it's a cotton or silk thread wrapped in foil paper). You usually couch them in pairs, but you could get a nice shiny gold and it's got a sort of wirey consistency so it's easy to get nice curves. On the down side you can't get it wet/wash it.

You can couch a number of other types of threads/cords though, so that's not the only option, of course.
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Anonymous 06/12/14(Thu)05:09 UTC+1 No.7611926 Report

>>7611863
Thanks for the advice! I'm not sure that I want it to be shiny, but I'll definitely look into it anyway before I make my final decision (and then I'll be able to decide whether I have to do it by hand or if I can do it by machine).
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