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/diy/ - Do-It-Yourself

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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)00:15 UTC+1 No.669658 Report

What are some ways I can improve the weather performance of my house from the outside? I'm renting a house and I've made all the changes I can on the inside. The walls are well insulated for its age, it has a slab foundation and the attic insulation was doubled a few years back. The complete HVAC system was replaced last year. I've also sealed all the cracks, replaced the weather stripping, moved all my big furniture (dressers and bookcases) against the outside walls and put those little draft guard things in all my outlets and switch covers. Finally I've put that clear plastic stuff on the inside frame of the windows to make an air pocket between the inside of the house and the window. Thats all I can think of for the inside.

Outside I haven't done much. I planted some canna lilies around the outside of the place to help cover the walls from sunlight. They grow about 4 feet tall. Pic related, from google. I've also put a sun shade up over the patio to shade some more space around the house. I've looked into a shade for the AC condenser but the space around it is very limited and I don't know if it would be worth the investment for only being able to shade a few inches around it. What about those light reflecting window films? Anyone have experience with them? What else can I do?

Limiting factors: The windows are single pane, aluminum frame and from the Johnson administration. I'm in California, which is in the middle of the worst drought in 40 years, so I can't use water. That eliminates a misting system for the condenser. Finally, I rent and the landlord ain't gonna pay for shit or allow me to make significant changes to the place (no new windows). Cheaper the better but I'm willing to spend if the return on investment will be good. If I can take it with me, even better.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)00:22 UTC+1 No.669661 Report

>>669658
>What about those light reflecting window films?
I put this on three west-facing windows
inexpensive, relatively easy to apply
dropped the indoor temp by several degrees in the afternoon
it was worth it
>Home Depot ~$20 for enough to do three windows (95% reflectivity)
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)01:20 UTC+1 No.669686 Report

>>669658
It's cheaper to turn off the AC and troll the mall all day until nightfall. Take a book, pack a lunch, chill.

Failing that. Change all the light bulbs used for general lighting to LED. (CFL to read by) they give off less heat and will save a few dollars a month.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)01:43 UTC+1 No.669692 Report

>>669661
Nice. I will pick up some the next time I'm out then. Does it peel off easy? Can you reapply it? I ask because we like to let in the light in winter.

>>669686
Sadly I have an elder living with me thats basically home bound. We replaced all the incandescent lights years ago. We also keep lighting to a minimum, mostly do the fact that the ender in question grew up during the depression and is super anal about stuff like that.

Every time I post I'll throw up a random DIY related image.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)02:08 UTC+1 No.669698 Report

>>669692
>Does it peel off easy? Can you reapply it? I ask because we like to let in the light in winter.
Don't know, haven't tried. It lets most of the light in. I just reflects a lot of the heat.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)04:00 UTC+1 No.669732 Report

thick curtains.
misting system. these are big in california. people just put up high pressure misters around the house to cool things down.

when its really hot, get the hose and spray your roof.

would a water tank be out of the question? just feed a hose into the tank and refill it. pretend you didnt.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)04:15 UTC+1 No.669734 Report

>>669732
Duh, Jackass, fines aplenty for using a hose during the worst drought in 40 years.

Reurn ru read
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)04:25 UTC+1 No.669738 Report

Op here.

>>669698
I did some looking and it doesn't look like its too easy to remove and replace them. No big deal though. They are about $40 though, which is a bit on the high side for something I can't take with me.

>>669732
This >>669734. They are issuing $500 fines if they see stuff like that. Thats about 3 month of my electric bill. I'll pass.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)11:33 UTC+1 No.669842 Report

Exterior window awnings can help. Its probably out of your price range though if you can't get the landlord to pay for it. You can DIY some out of some shade fabric though. A roll of the stuff costs about $35 and you can take it with you when you go.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)12:55 UTC+1 No.669861 Report

>>669734
>shhhhheeeeeeeeiiiitt.jpg
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)13:00 UTC+1 No.669863 Report

>>669658
Retractable awnings do a great job of keeping the sun off the walls of a house and since they are retractable, you can roll them up in winter when they are not needed. They attached and detach from the wall without too much fuss, so you can take them with you if you leave or sell them.
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)13:19 UTC+1 No.669867 Report

>>669658
Dont seal up the house, you'll create a growing place for mold
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Anonymous 07/19/14(Sat)21:15 UTC+1 No.670012 Report

OP again. Man, I wish I could post PDFs on this board :(

>>669842
>>669863

The DIY awning out of some sunshade might work. Buying a real one is probably out. All but two of the windows of this place are super wide but not very tall and mounted pretty high up on the wall. I'd have to buy super wide awnings and I don't think I'd be able to reuse them easily if I moved. I could probably just hang that sunshade stuff from the eves and get the same effect. Thanks for the tips though, adding it to the list.

>>669867
Moisture isn't an issue out here. The house was well sealed at one point and it didn't have issues. I was just replacing the worn out caulking and weatherstripping. The air here is fairly dry most of the year. When its not its either summer humidity (when you're running the AC and drying the air) or its winter and raining and cold as shit (so your running the heater and drying the air). The only time I've ever head of people having mold issues here is from poorly vented bathrooms and leaks.
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