[ 3 / a / adv / an / asp / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / g / gd / int / jp / k / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / o / out / p / po / sci / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wsg / x]

/lit/ - Literature

<< back to board
[Delete this thread]

TurkishGuy 08/31/14(Sun)12:56 UTC+1 No.5366401 Report

Hello everyone.

Just finished 2666 by Roberto Bolano. It was a mind-blowing reading experience. Especially the the second, the fourth and the last parts.

One think I want to ask you is what is the purpose of the first parst, the one about translators ?

Was it written for creating a base for Archimboldi's existence in the novel or did Bolano use it purposely for showing the degeneration of 20th century literature ( corrupt love triangle, bourgeois lifestyle of the translators) ---- Also, don't forget that Bolano was a very devoted family man and he was hostile against the famous and rich authors ----

Let's talk about it.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)14:03 UTC+1 No.5366563 Report

>>5366401
Overrated book. Although it has its moments, there is feeling of incompleteness. Like the fourth part, where the redundant amount of killings become tiresome and superfluous, too much even considering them to be seen as statistics at the late part of the book. There is great sense of intermingling, unfamiliar people mired in the same enigma that is Santa Teresa, and however the story gets revealed to us part by part, it's still left unclear, namely what the Archimboldi and his intentions.

I recommend to check out Biblioklept.org; there is a few topics - much more on bolano itself - on the book that might reveal what you might have had overlooked; it might point out direction on what to look for if you plan on rereading.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)14:13 UTC+1 No.5366601 Report

>>5366563
Nope.
Its left unclear, yes. But I see that as a good thing. The unclearness feels like kafkas das schloss for example. It leaves a certain mystique, also the book wasnt finished. Te killings are just awesome, its a way to unreveal the statistic as a number. Stalin said: death of one is a tragedy, death of milions is statistics. Bolano uses these descriptions to show that gruesome death is always a tragedy.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)14:16 UTC+1 No.5366610 Report

>>5366563
>Like the fourth part, where the redundant amount of killings become tiresome and superfluous, too much even considering them to be seen as statistics at the late part of the book.
That's the whole point ya dunce.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)14:26 UTC+1 No.5366635 Report

>>5366401
It was incomplete.

Bolano said just before his death that he hadn't finished the chapter about Archimboldi. Also, a supposed sixth part of the book was found after he died, but hasn't been published yet, I believe.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)14:48 UTC+1 No.5366697 Report

>>5366610
This...I can't believe you would not understand that the entire point of The Killings is how the reader goes through stages of horror, excitement, apathy ect. ect.
The enormity of the killings and the length of the chapter are surely intentionally written like this to show that there is no 'one way' to feel about being confronted to such a vast amount of descriptions.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)15:00 UTC+1 No.5366721 Report

>>5366635
>>5366697
But I said it still felt redundant and boring even if the point of it was to make them feel like statistics. It just same effect could be produced with less descriptions.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)15:01 UTC+1 No.5366724 Report

>>5366401
I felt like the 4th part was kind of disappointing. I get that it's supposed to create a certain kind of feeling in the readers, but that didn't necessarily make for good reading. And even though it was supposed to be a kind of slice-of-horrid-life type thing, I would have liked to see more happen with Lalo Cura and that vigilante dude (Hector? Henry? I can't remember his name).

I think that the first, third, and fifth parts were my favorites, but I can't quite explain why. I know that the second felt a little too undercooked for me.

As for the academics, I think that it might be a sort of "love triumphs" kind of thing. Amidst adversity and the specter of death (seriously, I spent that entire first part expecting one of them to bite it) the Italian dude and British chick find their way. The same sort of things happen with Amalfitano, Archimboldi, and Fate at intervals. I think it's meant to show that even with all this terrible shit going down, there's room for humanity to redeem itself.

As for the academic side itself, I'm not too sure, but it felt sort of parody-ish. Like Bolano was mocking the academics for doing their jobs. Like in trying to explain Archimboldi's books, they were missing the points. It might have been a jab by Bolano at anyone who attempted to analyze 2666--they'd miss the point and fail. Some things aren't able to be explained.

But look at me, analyzing the book. Looks like I missed the point myself.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)15:06 UTC+1 No.5366736 Report

>>5366721
From my experience, the apathy and boredom was an essential part where it progressed in the end in a different type of horror than I initially felt.

Horror without the excitement, basically just very depressed.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)15:09 UTC+1 No.5366743 Report

>>5366724
I multiple books of Bolanõ it seems there are greater and lesser characters, but the majority just enter the story and have it end without any conclusion.
Sometimes a bit frustrating or sad, but I always got the feeling the characters just continue on with their life.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)15:30 UTC+1 No.5366786 Report

>>5366724
Come to think of it bow, the part of Academics seems like a Bolano's depiction of perversities that take undergo "Intellectual" life. The slow revealing of them, getting new experience. If I remember correctly, the first sexual acts took place considering each other's emotions; then it just grew more open, less private, like they all were starting to enjoy this sodomy. Later on they are exposed to even more twisted arousal, precisely, the part where they get horny on beating the taxi driver. Eventually it all pales in the terrifying light - or dimness - of the killings.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)15:59 UTC+1 No.5366861 Report

>mfw some faggot in my class pronounced it two-six-six-six instead of twentysix-sixty-six
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)16:01 UTC+1 No.5366865 Report

>>5366861
>mfw some faggot doesn't say it in espanol and is a giant cockgurgling faggot
>>
TurkishGuy 08/31/14(Sun)18:38 UTC+1 No.5367405 Report

Op again. Which characters do you like the most ?

Personally, I would glady read a whole novel about Lalo Cura's life.
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)19:37 UTC+1 No.5367698 Report

>>5366865
veintiseis sesenta y seis??

Sounds terrible imo
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)19:45 UTC+1 No.5367721 Report

>>5367698
dos mil seiscientos sesenta y seis :^)
>>
Anonymous 08/31/14(Sun)19:55 UTC+1 No.5367761 Report

>>5367405
Fate because he was alpha as fuck
>>
Anonymous 09/01/14(Mon)03:00 UTC+1 No.5369420 Report

>>5367405
For some reason I loved amalfitanos story. Probably because It felt most intimate and so well written.
>>
Anonymous 09/01/14(Mon)03:05 UTC+1 No.5369434 Report

>>5367698
Quit spanish, gringo
All the content on this website comes from 4chan.org. All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster. 4chanArchive is not affiliated with 4chan.