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/n/ - Transportation - Any potential in these bikes?

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Any potential in these bikes? Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:39 UTC+1 No.641635 Report

What can anyone tell me about this bike?
It's a hand-me-down from an acquaintance. I got it last year, and it's been in storage since then, so obviously it needs maintenance.
Disclaimer: I don't know anything about bikes but I plan on doing research soon.

I want to go touring this summer, and I'm going need a decent bike for the trip. I don't want to spend more than $1000, and I'm willing to buy used and/or build a bike to keep the cost under 1000$.

I've not ridden this bike yet. It seems too tall for me because only my tip toes reach the ground. Then again, I don't know how it should fit. I have another bike where my feet lie flat on the ground, and that seems better.

So is there any potential here? Any parts I could salvage, improve on, whatever?
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:41 UTC+1 No.641637 Report

>>641635
And this is the one I've ridden, the smaller one.
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:48 UTC+1 No.641644 Report

>>641635
>I've not ridden this bike yet. It seems too tall for me because only my tip toes reach the ground.
If you can barely reach the ground while standing with the top tube between your legs it sounds too big for you.
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:53 UTC+1 No.641647 Report

>>641644
Yep. Is that just a simple seat height adjustment, or is it too tall, end of story?
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:57 UTC+1 No.641649 Report

Well try lowering the seat on your first bike if it's close. Off a basic estimate your feet should be only partially touching the ground. Adjust the seats for each and see what fits better.

If i saw the bikes lying there out in the open, I would take the fenders from second, clip pedals from the first. And uhhh... That'd be it
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:59 UTC+1 No.641650 Report

>>641637

Dat mixte frame
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:59 UTC+1 No.641651 Report

>>641649
If you can touch the ground without tilting the bike while on the saddle, it's probably a bit low. But if the same thing applies while standing over the top tube, the bike is too big.
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:00 UTC+1 No.641654 Report

>>641649
>I would take the fenders from second, clip pedals from the first. And uhhh... That'd be it

lol good to know. I'm going to buy/assemble a new bike anyway, but I wanted to write these off before I start looking at other bikes.
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:01 UTC+1 No.641655 Report

>>641650
Don't talk shit about my framefu.
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:03 UTC+1 No.641658 Report

>>641655

I meant it in a good way

Put some drops on that beauty and it'd be a gem
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:06 UTC+1 No.641660 Report

>>641658
But it's a city bike, right? Nothing that can be turned into a touring bike?
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:22 UTC+1 No.641669 Report

>>641660

It's a road bike. But yeah it'd be hard to tour on it without rack mounts
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:27 UTC+1 No.641671 Report

>>641669
Can't you just nigger-rig a rack on with some well-placed clamps?
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:49 UTC+1 No.641678 Report

So what are the basics of a touring bicycle? What can I get away with? What do I NOT need?

e.g.
>frame material
>tires
>number of gears (I don't know anything about gears)
>other stuff
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)23:10 UTC+1 No.641686 Report

>>641678
>frame material
Steel or Aluminium

>tires
28-40mm width, depending on load, terrain and personal preference. I'd recommend slicks for developed countries, but if you expect a lot of mud, get semi-slicks (with knobs along the side). 26" for third world countries, otherwise it doesn't matter much. Get a tire that's got good puncture protection.

>number of gears
Any current (or 20-year old) derailleur with a triple crankset will have enough gears for loaded touring.
I personally think an 8 gear IGH or the 2x7 gears of an old road bike are fine, too. But opinions differ on that. You'll have to get out of the saddle on some climbs with these options.

>other stuff
Good rack. Read the description on max load. Don't assume you can add more. I've got a bent rack and one where screws broke out of their threads cause I overloaded them.
Good panniers save you a lot of headaches, but are expensive.
Road bikes and MTB's CAN be too short to ride with panniers and fenders (but not all are). You'll touch the front fenders with your toes on tight turns and hit the panniers with your heels. This is why dedicated touring bikes have a longer wheelbase.
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Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)23:41 UTC+1 No.641697 Report

Either of those bikes could be a fine tourer. The first bike looks more apt, although what do you mean "tip toes", when you're in the saddle? Or when you're straddling the bar?

Anyway if it's comfy to ride, it would be ideal. You can clamp racks on fine without needing braze-ons.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)23:43 UTC+1 No.641698 Report

>>641647

A correctly setup saddle typically means you can't touch the ground while seated. If you can, then your legs aren't extended enough at bottom-bracket height and you're just riding like a gooftard.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:03 UTC+1 No.641710 Report

>>641697
I meant that when I sit on the saddle, the tips of my toes are the only part of my foot which touches the ground. I feel like there isn't balance that way, and the bikes feels a little overwhelming/hard to handle. Whereas on the other bike, my feet are flat on the ground when I'm in the saddle. Which may or may not be too low, I don't know, but it does feel "safer" and more comfortable than being on my toes.
I've yet to adjust the seat's height on the first one, so I'll try to get it to a point where the balls of my feet are resting on the ground when I'm in the saddle, and see how that feels.

>>641698
Ah, I didn't know that was the correct way. But as I mentioned above: when I'm in the saddle on the big bike and not moving, I need to prop myself up with one leg (while in the seat), and it feels unstable and unwieldy if I can only reach the ground with my toes (barely).
Maybe I've always missed some obvious aspect of using a bicycle. I've just always thought that you should be able to touch the ground while seated. So what you're saying is that if I want to stop my bike and stand idle, I brake and then immediately move my ass of the seat, and straddle the bike in a standing position between the handlebars and the seat?
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:03 UTC+1 No.641711 Report

>>641698
This is bullshit and completely dependent on BB height.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:07 UTC+1 No.641712 Report

>>641710
On all the bikes I've ridden in the past 15 years, I could reach the ground with my toetips after adjusting the saddle correctly.
What you should really do is put the balls of both feet on the pedals (holding yourself upright on a wall), turn the crank so one of your pedals is as far down as possible, and adjust the saddle so that leg is ALMOST fully extended.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:08 UTC+1 No.641713 Report

>>641635
Is it me or does that bike have an insanely low bottom bracket? It looks like the pedal, facing vertically, almost touches the ground even when the bike is upright. The toe cage looks to be contacting the ground.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:13 UTC+1 No.641719 Report

>>641712
I'm going to try this later.

>>641713
I don't know, maybe. I'll check it out later. If it is as low as you say, why would that be the case? Is it just built that way or did someone along the way make a weird adjustment?
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:18 UTC+1 No.641723 Report

>>641713

I think it's an optic illusion, notice that the asphalt line is not straight.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:21 UTC+1 No.641725 Report

>>641719
It's definitely built that way, no way that frame was ever intended for a suspension fork.
The only possible adjustment that would lead to less clearance between pedals and ground is a longer crank arm.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:50 UTC+1 No.641732 Report

>>641710

Well you need to break that habit, because as soon as you stop on a loaded touring bike without your feet flat on the ground, you're going to keel over.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:56 UTC+1 No.641734 Report

>>641732
gotcha
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)01:24 UTC+1 No.641747 Report

Anyway top bike woule be my pick, looks OK. The wheels are probably single-wall, but if you have decent puffy tyres like schwalbe they'll probably do fine and replacement is easy enough. Also check all the cables, put some fenders on it.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)06:50 UTC+1 No.641836 Report

>>641635
Is that a Rocky Mountain Sherpa? That bike would make great tourer if it fits. SunTour XCD bear trap pedals and a nice Avocet touring saddle. Vintage lugged MTBs are all the rage right now anyway.
Only problem with that is that it is huge. I'm 6'3" and I'm not sure if I could stand over that top tube without tilting the bike. Any drive side pics?
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)06:52 UTC+1 No.641838 Report

You've got two sweet bikes there OP. I'd be happy with that stable.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)13:17 UTC+1 No.641908 Report

>>641836
>Is that a Rocky Mountain Sherpa?
Yeah, it is.

>Only problem with that is that it is huge. I'm 6'3" and I'm not sure if I could stand over that top tube without tilting the bike.
I'm afraid it might be too big, but I'll check again later today when I mess around with the seat height adjustment.
>Any drive side pics?
I'm no good with bicycle terminology, tried to Google this, what is it? I can take a pic.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)13:22 UTC+1 No.641910 Report

>>641908
Pics from the right side where the drivetrain (chain, cassette, derailleur, crankset) are.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)15:37 UTC+1 No.641951 Report

>>641711
Yeah, it's completely false for those bikes with the BB at ground level!
Retard.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)18:03 UTC+1 No.642021 Report

>>641910
I dragged it out again, swung my leg over the top tube, and the tube nestled perfectly in my crotch. I'm 5'11. Is the bike too tall for me?

I took a pic of the drivetrain itself, but not the entire bike from the right side.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)19:13 UTC+1 No.642045 Report

>>642021
If the tube touches your crotch, the frame is too big. I had a Schwinn High Sierra with pretty much the same dimensions pass through my garage a few years ago, at 6'0 I could just barely ride it. Nice components though, looks like early Shimano Deore and some Takara cranks, pretty nice for a bike that's not from a big brand. Find a slightly smaller old MTB frame and move the components over and you'd have a nice ride.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)19:24 UTC+1 No.642051 Report

>>642021
>Is the bike too tall for me?

yep. that bike looks to be for 6' 3" tall people or maybe even taller. I don't think I've ever seen a headtube that long.

seems like a pretty cool rigid MTB from the late 80s/early 90s by the look of it, though. we would have preferred that you didn't cut off the rear derailleur in your pic (the machine thing on the chain in back.) what does it say on it (brand/numbers)?
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)19:31 UTC+1 No.642054 Report

>>641637
that's a really neat bike. to bad it probably weighs >9000 pounds. if you live in a flat area it might not bother you for leisure riding a few miles at a time
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)21:01 UTC+1 No.642102 Report

>>642045
>If the tube touches your crotch, the frame is too big.
That's too bad.
>Find a slightly smaller old MTB frame and move the components over and you'd have a nice ride.
I'll look into this, though.

>>642051
>we would have preferred that you didn't cut off the rear derailleur in your pic
My bad. Here it is (kinda overexposed, oh well). I didn't see any numbers, just the Shimano brand engraved there.

>>642054
Does it look like it's relatively heavy? It doesn't seem especially heavy. I've never really owned other bikes, so I can't compare.
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)21:03 UTC+1 No.642104 Report

throwing in a couple more
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Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)21:06 UTC+1 No.642108 Report

>>642104
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)23:19 UTC+1 No.642144 Report

>>642102
>Does it look like it's relatively heavy?
that saddle is probably 5 lbs by itself. the frame is steel. if it's an alloy (CrMo is common) and if the tubing is butted that makes it lighter but I doubt that model has either. that type of bike was never designed to be light. It's nice to have a light (ish) bike, but OTOH being what is known as a "weight weenie" makes you an insufferable cunt. I shouldn't have even brought it up, I was being an insufferable cunt. sorry.

>It doesn't seem especially heavy
don't worry about it then. ride the fuck out of it. but if you ever try out, say, a road bike, you will notice the difference immediately.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)00:08 UTC+1 No.642176 Report

>>642144
>but if you ever try out, say, a road bike, you will notice the difference immediately.
Well, in that case I might start noticing the difference because I do want to get a bicycle that will do well on a ~1500 km tour. This one might be a nice fixer-upper on the side, when I get around to learning about bike anatomy and mechanics.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:10 UTC+1 No.642198 Report

>>642021

That's probably passable in my book. If it's comfy to ride, ride it.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:12 UTC+1 No.642200 Report

>>642054

>caring about weight outside of racing
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:21 UTC+1 No.642203 Report

>>642200
flatlander detected
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:27 UTC+1 No.642205 Report

>>642203

>fagetlegs detected
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:28 UTC+1 No.642207 Report

>>642021

For a level top-tube bike, the benchmark for standover is the pubic bone. It's OK if your nuts brush the toptube, but you want a little gap to your bone.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:28 UTC+1 No.642208 Report

>>642205
>I pull 50 lbs. uphill and for fun in my free time.
>I also really enjoy changing brake pads.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:29 UTC+1 No.642209 Report

>>642208

>I'm going touring, better get a garbon frame
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)01:47 UTC+1 No.642219 Report

>>642207
>but you want a little gap to your bone
There's literally no gap, it just "nestles" perfectly in my crotch. The vertical distance from the ground to the top of the tube is exactly that of the ground to my crotch. This bike just feels really big for me, I'll be looking at slightly smaller frames.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)02:00 UTC+1 No.642226 Report

>>642219

Touches the bone? http://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=39
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)02:13 UTC+1 No.642228 Report

>>642226
Yep, just like in the video. I'm not a fan of such a close fit though, maybe I'll get a mixte frame... Or make sure there's a small gap when I get a frame. Why does the top tube have to be so high up, anyway?
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)02:22 UTC+1 No.642230 Report

>>642228

That's how things used to be. FWIW I rolled a frame which touched my junk for the longest time but no problem, the bike was very comfy otherwise. It's not as big a deal as you're making out if the bike is otherwise OK. Are you wearing shoes?
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)02:25 UTC+1 No.642232 Report

>>642228
standover height is just a simple guide line.
What you're really looking for is reach to the handlebars.
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Awesome Funposter 03/27/14(Thu)02:46 UTC+1 No.642240 Report

>>642232
Sizing by reach is flawed.

You need to find something that works in seat tube length, stack and reach. You may need to go to a suboptimal reach to get a usable stack measurement or if you're a midget, you have to take whatever frame that will let you reach the pedals. If you need a lower handlebar than what a bike with the proper reach allows, you but a spammer frame and a longer stem.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)02:50 UTC+1 No.642244 Report

>>642230
>Are you wearing shoes?
Yeah, flat sneakers.

>>642232
I see. I haven't been able to ride it yet because my butt can't reach the seat (too high). I didn't manage to lower the seat because the seat clamp is all but rusted over, but I'll take care of it soon and see if I can ride it without tipping over... Then again I probably just need to improve my cycling skills.
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Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)02:52 UTC+1 No.642245 Report

>>642244

WD40.
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Anonymous 04/03/14(Thu)03:05 UTC+1 No.645638 Report

>>641635

that head tube length. Holy shit. Sherpa? Is that an early Thorn maybe?
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Anonymous 04/03/14(Thu)03:07 UTC+1 No.645640 Report

>>645638

Oh I see now. Its a Rocky Mountain sherpa. A canadian brand. I like that tire clearance, that's great. You don't see that on modern bikes much.
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Anonymous 04/03/14(Thu)03:17 UTC+1 No.645644 Report

>>645638
OP here. Yeah it was made for a big person, 6'2 and over. I finally established that it doesn't fit me. I can barely straddle this thing.
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