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/n/ - Transportation - Would you ride an airplane anymore?

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Would you ride an airplane anymore? Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)00:37 UTC+1 No.638935 Report

After what happened with 9/11, MH370, and about 12 more incidents of recent crashes I never heard about but only just learned of this week while watching CNN, not to mention that one last week that lost half its wing, I don't think I ever want to ride in a plane again. The chances of something happening may be rare, but when it happens, it happens hard. Thankfully I never travel far, so unless for some reason I ever went to Europe, I never have to worry about flying. If anything I'd try to take a train from now on. They seem a lot more fun, and you get to see more of the countryside anyway.

Has all the recent plane disasters scared you off from flying?
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)01:03 UTC+1 No.638942 Report

That's how I feel. People love to throw the statistics in your face about how less likely accidents are. All I know is a car crash is instant, a plane crash is a horrifying experience where you have 60 seconds or less to accept that you are going to die a horrible death.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)01:10 UTC+1 No.638943 Report

No, I'll still fly. Every year there are around ~150 deaths due to plane crashes. Every same year, there are about 32,000 deaths and 2 million injuries from car crashes. Aircraft remain some of the safest means of transport.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)01:12 UTC+1 No.638944 Report

I'm going to die anyway. Caring about how I die is stupid, whether it's 60 seconds (more like five minutes of holding my breath followed by two minutes of asphyxiation before I pass out) or two years of palliative care in a hospital bed.

People who are afraid of low-probability deaths are just people who haven't realised the inevitability of their own demise. All life is a temporary phenomenon, we're nothing more than unstable electro-chemical reactions that are slowly winding down. Die quick, die slow, you're dead for the same amount of time when it's done.

I choose the option that lets my remaining time be spent in more interesting ways and getting on a plane does that for me.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)01:37 UTC+1 No.638947 Report

I don't like trusting my fate to people I have never met. At least when I am driving a car I am in control. I may get hit by someone else, but at least there's a slim chance I'll be able to react and try to avoid it. If the pilots of a plane pass out or what have you, then I have absolutely no chance to save myself. Then you hear the co-pilot of 370 was inviting women to party with him while he flew. No, these aren't the kind of guys I want in charge of my life.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)02:07 UTC+1 No.638956 Report

>>638947
You ever meet a surgeon?
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)02:10 UTC+1 No.638958 Report

>>638947
>I don't like trusting my fate to people I have never met.
Each day you trust your body into the hands of the world.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)02:12 UTC+1 No.638959 Report

Crime statistics are the lowest they've been since the 1970's but the media would have you believe it isn't safe to step foot outside your house. Do yourself a favor and stop watching tv news.

My retired parents watch CNN about 12 hours a day. I find it very disturbing. Either they have some crazy crime fetish or are senile and don't realize the same shit is repeated every 15 minutes.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)02:17 UTC+1 No.638962 Report

>>638956
I hope most surgeons aren't having parties during the surgery. But I've never had one. Honestly I might decline it anyway, there's a lot of these guys who get slammed with malpractice. It depends on how life threatening it was.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)03:00 UTC+1 No.638989 Report

The thing is not airplanes are safer than they look, but highways are more dangerous than they look.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)03:23 UTC+1 No.639004 Report

>Has all the recent plane disasters scared you off from flying?

No, because I'm not an irrational fuck head like yourself. Wow, 12 plane crashes in recent memory. Do you have any idea how many injuries and deaths are caused by car crashes daily? Do you drive? I bet you don't even give it a second thought.

Please do your brain and society a favor and take it easy on your cable news diet. That shit is not good for you in large amounts. Despite CNN's coverage would lead you to believe, planes are not falling out of the fucking sky on a daily basis.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)03:28 UTC+1 No.639007 Report

>>638959
>Do yourself a favor and stop watching tv news.

This. Even with all the mass shooting you are statistically more likely to be killed by a police officer than a mad gunman or terrorist. Once you filter out shootings related to the drug trade most places people consider dangerous are relatively safe as long as you do not participate in the drug trade.

Planes, especially airlines operating in 1st world countries with US/EU built aircraft, are the safest way to travel with trains coming up in 2nd. Both do a good job of removing pilot error and maintenance issues from the equation. Cars while dangerous compared to planes and trains are safe if you don't speed, use a phone while diving, or drive drunk. Remove those factors and deaths from car accidents are only 10,000/yr in the US. Even with bicycles poor decisions by riders often factor into their deaths.

I like flying on planes with ample leg room for the price. I don't like getting groped by the TSA more than I like flying though. Another media bias; the TSA does jack shit to keep us safe. Metal detectors, locked cockpit doors, and incompetent terrorists do more to keep us safe than feeling up people's junk.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)04:46 UTC+1 No.639049 Report

>>638935
Sure, but I stopped flying commercial when DHS went full retard after 9/11.

Fuck that nonsense.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)08:49 UTC+1 No.639127 Report

Airline safety is much improved today versus the 80s and earlier in no small part thanks to improved technology. A lot of the great plane disasters of old (PSA 182, Pan Am 759, Delta 191, etc) happened due to limitations in the avionics of that time. Even cargo plane accidents, which were once a routine occurrence, are much rarer now. And all this despite 3x the air traffic of the 70s.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)08:51 UTC+1 No.639129 Report

>>639127
>Airline safety is much improved today versus the 80s and earlier in no small part thanks to improved technology

I should add, "Along with better pilot training."
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)08:57 UTC+1 No.639131 Report

>1,600 mile trip
>4 hours in plane
>24 hours in car
no fucking way am I taking a car/bus/train unless there are lots of places I actually want to stop at.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:01 UTC+1 No.639133 Report

>>638943
The all-time deadliest year in commercial aviation was 1985, in which 1257 people were killed (accidents only - not counting intentional acts such as terrorism). Even so, a fraction of the amount of automobile fatalities in the US that year (43,825)
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:10 UTC+1 No.639136 Report

>>639133
One interesting thing is how aircraft disasters tend to happen in waves. Like 1977-79 saw a string of major accidents, then 1980-81 were pretty quiet, 82 had a couple biggies, 83-84 were quiet once again, 85 was the worst year as mentioned above, then 88-89 a couple big crashes. In 1996, you had TWA 800 and ValuJet 592.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:19 UTC+1 No.639138 Report

>>638935
On the other hand, if you're in a car accident, you're more likely to survive while being maimed for life while in a plane crash, you most likely just die. Probably better to be dead than a quadriplegic.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:29 UTC+1 No.639139 Report

>>639127
>A lot of the great plane disasters of old (PSA 182, Pan Am 759, Delta 191, etc) happened due to limitations in the avionics of that time

i'm not familiar. please summarize these accidents for me.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:36 UTC+1 No.639140 Report

>>639139
>PSA 182
727 collides with a Cessna and falls into a San Diego suburb. Horrendous, horrendous accident - one of the worst to happen on US soil.
>Pan Am 759
Thunderstorm causes 727 to go off-course and tear through a Louisiana suburb.
>Delta 191
Lockheed Tristar crashes after takeoff due to microburst-induced wind shear from a thunderstorm.

PSA 182 happened because the pilots had to rely on purely visual coverage to keep track of the Cessna and failed to do so (nowadays electronic aids would help in this situation). The other two were due to limitations in weather-detection equipment of the time.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:43 UTC+1 No.639142 Report

>>639138
>if you're in a car accident, you're more likely to survive while being maimed for life

Not necessarily. I don't know how you're defining maimed, but I think it's better to lose a leg than be dead, and even that is going to an extreme case. Most car accidents happen at speeds under 35 mph, so if you are wearing your seatbelt you have a pretty good chance to walk away with only minor injuries. On the other hand, nearly 100% of air accidents are fatal no matter how many seatbelts you equip.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:44 UTC+1 No.639143 Report

>>639140
>727 collides with a Cessna and falls into a San Diego suburb. Horrendous, horrendous accident - one of the worst to happen on US soil
Actually, there have been worse like AA 191 the following year, but because this flight came down in a suburban neighborhood, tons of people saw the debris and dead bodies while AA 191 crashed at O'Hare International Airport so mostly just witnessed by police/firemen/other rescue personnel.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:50 UTC+1 No.639145 Report

>>639143
I might add the NTSB has a delicious knack for understatement. In the official report for Aeromexico 498 (which happened in 1986 and was spookily similar to PSA 182), they commented that "The cockpit crew's bodies were too badly fragmented to permit autopsy or toxicology tests."
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:53 UTC+1 No.639147 Report

>>639145
Damn.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)09:57 UTC+1 No.639148 Report

>>639147
PSA 182 only had four intact bodies - two passengers, a flight attendant, and the first officer and the captain's remains were never found so they just buried him in a common grave with a couple other passengers
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:01 UTC+1 No.639149 Report

They say that a lot of dead people in plane crashes are found nude. It's not clear why this happens, but it might be due to the suction of the fuselage ripping open that strips their clothing off.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:03 UTC+1 No.639150 Report

>>639145
>"The cockpit crew's bodies were too badly fragmented to permit autopsy or toxicology tests."
Fuck, they make it sound like the dead people were a piece of the plane or something
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:05 UTC+1 No.639151 Report

>>639145
PSA 182 only had four intact bodies - two passengers, a flight attendant, and the first officer. The captain's remains were never found so they just buried him in a common grave with a couple other passengers.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:13 UTC+1 No.639154 Report

AA 587 was a horrendous crash that killed 250 people, but was almost ignored coming two months after 9/11
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Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:22 UTC+1 No.639158 Report

With as highly regulated as air traffic is, and with as much training as pilots have, and with as much on-board technology to steer the plane as exists, planes should simply not be crashing this frequently. I know we all grew up with planes and it seems like they've been around forever, but the technology is barely 100 years old, and for massive commercial jets it's even much less. It's in its relative infancy still. The fact a jet like the 370 can just vanish without a trace is a scary thought, considering every modern cell phone is GPS capable. There should be absolutely no reason at all to not have mandatory trackers on every jet that cannot be disabled. I don't know what average crash/year ratio is, but even if it's 1 per 10 years that's awfully high, to me, considering these jets are 2.6 million dollars apiece and the pilots have to spend years in training.
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Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:24 UTC+1 No.639160 Report

>not wearing your bicycle helmet while flying
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Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:25 UTC+1 No.639161 Report

>>639158
TBF, the majority of accidents nowadays happen in Third World countries
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Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:27 UTC+1 No.639162 Report

>>639158
when you're piloting a giant metal tube filled with explosive liquids, what the fuck do you expect to happen
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:29 UTC+1 No.639163 Report

>>639158
Besides which, as we pointed out, air travel is significantly safer now than 30 years ago
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)10:42 UTC+1 No.639166 Report

If only somebody on that plane had activated Strava at the first sign of trouble..

Imagine the publicity!
>I was using Strava before everyone knew about it
>mainstream
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)11:01 UTC+1 No.639178 Report

>>639166
I activate Strava before all flights.

Easy KoM
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)11:03 UTC+1 No.639179 Report

>>639142
that and car accidents don't usually result in a fire. aircraft accidents have explosions/fires at least 80% of the time.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)14:12 UTC+1 No.639207 Report

>>639142
>>639179
There are aircraft incidents that don't result in major injuries, although they are not generally crashes. You can land a plane after your engine goes out with nobody getting hurt, and nobody calling it an accident.

You also have a smaller chance of getting in a major accident in which someone dies, with both airplanes and cars.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)14:34 UTC+1 No.639209 Report

No. I still will buy airplane ticket and fly around the world.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)14:35 UTC+1 No.639210 Report

I fucking hate flying, but only because of how fucking poor the service usually is. I hate long waits, shit food and uncomfortable seats.
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Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)15:02 UTC+1 No.639221 Report

>>639210
The service is only poor because you can't afford 1st class.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)16:08 UTC+1 No.639230 Report

>>639161
The last major accident involving a 1st world airline was air France 447 back in 2009. Before that you need to look back to 2001.

>>639207
The wiki article on major accidents lists dozens of incidents that results in few to no injuries.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)22:33 UTC+1 No.639369 Report

>>639210
Flying must have been nicer in the pre-deregulation days (before 1979) when airlines were sexist as fuck and only hired young, attractive single women as flight attendants. Nowadays your FA might be a 55 year old Brazilian tranny with tattoos.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)22:37 UTC+1 No.639371 Report

>>639230
>The last major accident involving a 1st world airline was air France 447 back in 2009. Before that you need to look back to 2001

For comparison, in the 60s-80s, you averaged one major accident on a First World airline every year or two.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)23:08 UTC+1 No.639383 Report

>>639369

Yeah, back then you could grab the FA's ass as they walked down the aisle or make lewd comments about enjoying their endowments and they couldn't do shit.

Nowadays if you pulled that shit they emergency land the plane and have you shipped off to Git-mo to rot.
>>
Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)23:11 UTC+1 No.639388 Report

>>639371
1984 was the safest year during that stretch, with only around 220 commercial airline fatalities, none on a First World airline.

The calm before the disasters of 85.
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Anonymous 03/21/14(Fri)23:17 UTC+1 No.639390 Report

>>639210
>>639221
If it's any consolation, the 1st class passengers are usually the first people to be killed in a crash
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)01:12 UTC+1 No.639435 Report

>>638935
>Has all the recent plane disasters scared you off from flying?

I'll be flying PHX-PHL-MAD on Monday. I'm not scurred.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)01:27 UTC+1 No.639440 Report

>>639369
Plenty of airlines still operate in that environment, what's the mascot of Singapore Airlines again?
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)04:53 UTC+1 No.639507 Report

The remains of the instrument panel from Southern Airways 242, which crashed in northern Georgia one April morning in 1977 after the pilots unwisely flew into a thunderstorm which caused the engines to ingest massive amounts of rainwater and fail in midair. Several people survived, including two flight attendants.
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Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:05 UTC+1 No.639512 Report

>>639507
http://ashevilleoralhistoryproject.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/flight-242-faa-photos-1977-17.jpg
so much gore in that pic
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:16 UTC+1 No.639520 Report

>>639512
Eh? There's no dead bodies in there. I would guess the NTSB took the photos of the wreckage after all the stiffs were removed.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:23 UTC+1 No.639523 Report

>>639520
As I understand, the police and other first responders always are the first at a crash site and after they've removed the dead, then the NTSB team goes to work documenting everything
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:31 UTC+1 No.639528 Report

>>638935

Think of it this way: You hear about a plane crash and it's such an unexpected, novel, tragic event that it gets reported on nonstop for weeks in such detail that it terrifies you. When you turn on the morning news, a 4-car pile up is reported as a traffic blockage and you're advised to take another road.

Car accidents are so commonplace they're casually reported as an inconvenience to your morning commute rather than an unexpected or tragic incident of injury or death.

That makes me much more scared to be on the road than on a plane.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:35 UTC+1 No.639530 Report

>>639520
The pilots in SA 242 were ejected out of the cockpit anyway, so I would guess their bodies weren't near the instrument panel.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:49 UTC+1 No.639536 Report

>>639143
>>639140
Location of the PSA 182 crash. There is little direct evidence of it visible today, except for the houses rebuilt afterwards which are much newer than the surrounding ones built in the 1920s-30s.

Impact point was on the right side of the street where the white house is and the leaning telephone pole was caused by the crash (remarkable that it's been like that in the more than three decades since).
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)05:52 UTC+1 No.639537 Report

>>639536
The wall and One Way sign were both there when the crash happened. A large pile of body parts landed here as most of the passengers were ejected from the left side of the fuselage and thrown in this direction.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)06:01 UTC+1 No.639538 Report

>>639528
to be fair any car pileup that resulted in the deaths of about 300 people would be reported as a major catastrophe.

especially if 300 people's cars just disappeared and never got to work and nobody could track where they'd gone.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)07:21 UTC+1 No.639553 Report

>>639528
Most morning commute accidents aren't fatal. In bigger cities it's usually some guy pulled in front of another going 20 mph in the gridlock and they had to call for a cop to come on scene and file a report which just slows everything down.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)11:08 UTC+1 No.639613 Report

"It was, I remember distinctly, 3:15," says retired Chicago Police Sgt. Ken Burger. "I heard an airplane and I thought, 'Boy that airplane sounds kind of low.' Then it went 'rrrrr-pow!,' like backfire. And I thought, 'Oh man, that sounds like a plane in trouble.'"

"The sun had set and soon we were working by flashlights and lighting trucks brought to the scene. I found myself tangled in what seemed to be miles and miles of fine wire. I was in the area where the cockpit and it’s instrument panel had landed. Soon I saw a blue jacket sleeve with horizontal stripes near the cuffs. It was a pilot’s Hart, Schaffner& Marks brand jacket with the name “LUX” printed with a blue ballpoint pen above the inside pocket. It was the jacket of the captain, Walter Lux. His body and two more required some extra effort to remove the wire and instruments from their remains."

-- CPD Officer Paul Huebel describing the wreckage of AA 191
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)11:33 UTC+1 No.639614 Report

>>639613
>"It was, I remember distinctly, 3:15," says retired Chicago Police Sgt. Ken Burger. "I heard an airplane and I thought, 'Boy that airplane sounds kind of low.' Then it went 'rrrrr-pow!,' like backfire. And I thought, 'Oh man, that sounds like a plane in trouble.'"

The backfiring noise was probably a transient compressor stall
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)11:59 UTC+1 No.639618 Report

>>639613
Fun fact: AA 191 was equipped with a closed-circuit TV system and a "cockpit cam" that allowed passengers to see the flight crew at work. This feature was only used on widebody airliners for a few years in the 70s and then discontinued. Although rumors had it that they got rid of the cockpit cam following the DC-10 disaster, it was more likely the result of airlines not wanting to get sued in the event passengers witnessed some fuckup on the crew's part
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)12:01 UTC+1 No.639620 Report

>>639618
I kind of doubt the cockpit cam was removed due to complaints from the dead passengers
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)12:04 UTC+1 No.639622 Report

>>639620
True, but it's quite likely the TV system lost power anyway following the engine breaking off. In any case, the passengers were much more likely distracted looking at the wing.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)14:45 UTC+1 No.639666 Report

>>639553
Actually, police don't even turn up to accidents unless someone is hurt badly enough to need an ambulance or there's serious conflict, there's just too many car crashes.
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Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)14:48 UTC+1 No.639668 Report

>>639618
>>639620
And them being afraid that they'd see the captain shagging stewardesses or something.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)15:29 UTC+1 No.639676 Report

>>639668
The captain would just turn the cameras off in that case anyway ;)
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)15:29 UTC+1 No.639677 Report

>>638935
>take a train from now on
>a lot more fun
>get to see more of the countryside

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eschede_train_disaster

Yes!
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)15:33 UTC+1 No.639679 Report

>>639613
>It was the jacket of the captain, Walter Lux. His body and two more required some extra effort to remove the wire and instruments from their remains.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)21:05 UTC+1 No.639774 Report

>>638935
don't be a fag.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)22:13 UTC+1 No.639808 Report

>>638935
You hear about the bad things that happen, but not the flights that arrive with no problems
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)22:20 UTC+1 No.639811 Report

There is no excuse not to have video cameras in the cockpit at all times filming the pilots. They can complain about >muh privacy! all they want, but when you're on the job you forfeit that privacy and submit to being scrutinized by your boss. If your boss can not be there in person to monitor you then a camera system is appropriate. Even moreso when you are responsible for 250 lives. If you feel the need to discuss how you are cheating on your wife or did coke off strippers' tits the last time you where in Vegas you probably should focus on doing your actual job you are being paid to do. Besides, only the officials will be viewing the recordings anyway, the public will likely never know, so "privacy" is not even a real issue.
>>
Anonymous 03/22/14(Sat)22:58 UTC+1 No.639826 Report

>>639811
There already are CVR which record everything that's going on in the cockpit audio-wise, so your coke stripper story will get reviewed if you crash the plane.

I don't know how much more useful adding video would be, since you'd need to have a camera in a good position in order for it to show useful stuff (beyond obvious things like the pilot frothing at mouth). Switch positions and other stuff like that is better recorded by actually recording the inputs, and if the pilots decide to have an orgy in the cockpit you'll hear it anyway.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)00:30 UTC+1 No.639851 Report

>>639826
I guess it would be to show whether people are at the controls, awake etc.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)01:18 UTC+1 No.639872 Report

If a terrorist rushed them or something it'd be better to see what happens rather than just hear it and try to imagine it. It could help them design better cockpits. I don't think the cameras need to see every button press though.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)01:43 UTC+1 No.639880 Report

>>639679
Somewhere in a file cabinet, there's graphic photos of the dead bodies from this flight taken by investigators.

How much would you pay to see the photos?
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)07:21 UTC+1 No.640038 Report

One reason for improved airline safety nowadays is also a change in the culture of piloting. In the 50s-80s, loads of pilots were ex-military (WWII, Korea, Vietnam vets) and a lot of these guys were pretty arrogant and thought because they'd survived aerial combat in the Pacific or something, civilian air travel was babby stuff and they could handle almost any situation that came up.

Since nowadays all those pilots are dead or have retired by now and we haven't had a war with a draft military since Vietnam, there's far fewer ex-Air Force guys flying jets now.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)17:31 UTC+1 No.640176 Report

>>639179

I'm not an expert, but I think fires have been greatly reduced.
This is kind of inspiring, in that both fucking engines failed instantly on approach, and the captain managed to get it down without massive structural failure or fire, with no fatalities. And the fire crews were pumping foam 30 SECONDS after the alarm. Not to mention the supercool ATC.
Listening to this made me feel better about landing with first world airlines for sure.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJNVVlBPi8M
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)17:36 UTC+1 No.640182 Report

>>639880

>2014
>photos in a file cabinet

lol, nope.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)18:04 UTC+1 No.640198 Report

>>640182
Various government organizations like that actually keep 30+ year old photos as physical photos in a file cabinet. Digitizing old archives that are unlikely to see much use is an expensive and involved process.
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Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)18:09 UTC+1 No.640200 Report

>>640198
Weren,t you talking about MH370? if not, my bad.
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Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)23:07 UTC+1 No.640391 Report

>>640200

Follow the bouncing quote links back to this post: >>639613

>wreckage of the AA 191
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)01:42 UTC+1 No.640526 Report

you guys seen this? It's beautiful

vimeo.com/70994185
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)04:51 UTC+1 No.640672 Report

>>640182
Obviously when they were taken in the 70s, they didn't have computer storage, you nitwit.

>>640198
You could probably get them under the Freedom Of Information Act
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)04:55 UTC+1 No.640674 Report

>>640672
Ha ha, of course. The NTSB photodocuments all plane crash sites.

Example, >>639512 and >>639507. It's just that most of the photos aren't floating around on the Internet and likely just sit in a file cabinet somewhere.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)04:57 UTC+1 No.640676 Report

>>639536
Almost, but the impact point was actually in the middle of the street there (it's still visible where they filled in the crater). Most of the wreckage and bodies were thrown left down to the Boundary St. wall.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)05:01 UTC+1 No.640680 Report

>>639679
Fun story. The captain (Walter Lux) was originally supposed to command a flight from Phoenix to Chicago that day, but at the last minute he was moved to a Chicago-Los Angeles one.

His wife, after arriving in Chicago post-crash with American Airlines officials, met the captain who was originally supposed to fly Flight 191. That must have been an interesting exchange.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)21:21 UTC+1 No.641002 Report

At least in a car accident I feel like I'm in control. Like I could swerve out of the way or at least try. It may be an illusion of control in some situations but it's better than sitting on a plane and going down. You can't even try to survive just fucking take it
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)21:33 UTC+1 No.641006 Report

>>641002
Illuding your self in to an illusion of control negates the reality that you're far less safe?
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)22:29 UTC+1 No.641014 Report

>>641002
>in a car accident I feel like I'm in control.
Remember that the next time you hit a patch of black ice. Think about that the next time you hear about a drunk driver running a red light and T-boning a completely unaware mother driving her 3 children home from the movies only leaving the youngest alive permanently in a vegetative state.

No thanks, I'll take my (extremely less likely) chances on 30 seconds of confused terror followed by complete instantaneous disintegration.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)23:21 UTC+1 No.641031 Report

>>638942

>mfw it's quite common to be trapped in a burning deathcage and being killed by fire.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)23:22 UTC+1 No.641033 Report

>>638962

No, they're working 20 hour days churning through diseased shitlords.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)00:00 UTC+1 No.641057 Report

>>638942

It's far, far more likely that you will be horribly maimed and/or burned in a car crash than outright killed. Next time you see someone in a wheelchair or an amputee, consider that the most likely reason they are that way is car crash.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)00:39 UTC+1 No.641079 Report

>>641033
While mainling saline to cope with the hangover from last night's nurses party. While flirting with the anaesthesiologist.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)04:00 UTC+1 No.641153 Report

>>641014
>No thanks, I'll take my (extremely less likely) chances on 30 seconds of confused terror followed by complete instantaneous disintegration

Mmmnah, I'd still rather not have been on this thing.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)05:03 UTC+1 No.641176 Report

>>641153
Yup. Same. People on the left side looking out the window of this flight, would have actually seen the engine rip off and roll over the wing. I don't need that shit in my life! Even if it is about to end in a couple minutes ..
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)05:57 UTC+1 No.641206 Report

>>641153
I don't think it's supposed to do that.
>>
BaconRider 03/25/14(Tue)05:57 UTC+1 No.641208 Report

oo GONDI!!! the wing is on FIE<< ALL DUD!ALLLLLL DUD!!WAAAAA! HAy, wats THIS!
>pic
,
,tiny parachute,tiny strobe,vinyl drysuit,,steal a baby!
,,seat cushion flotation?nothanks, will take the orange drink.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)06:21 UTC+1 No.641249 Report

>>641208
Do you keep a parachute in the milk crate on your trike for that purpose?
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)06:27 UTC+1 No.641260 Report

I know it takes a while to know you're dead in a flight, but the death is instantaneous compared to a car r-right?
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)07:11 UTC+1 No.641289 Report

>>641208
Air pressure differential x size of emergency door = ? I imagine you'd need to be superman to get that thing open in flight.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)07:41 UTC+1 No.641300 Report

Now that we have finally discovered that the "cost-effective" but highly deadly twin engine Boeing 777 is not as immortal as they say, we should probably go back and have four engine plane as our normal planes.
>four engined planes
>consumes more fuel but lesser accidents
>faster than twin engined planes
>more reliable in case an engine goes bad
>highly chosen by more passengers
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)08:45 UTC+1 No.641349 Report

>>641176
Or this.

Some witnesses claimed they could see the passenger's faces pressed against the windows staring at the burning wing.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)08:49 UTC+1 No.641355 Report

>>641349
Given that most of the dead had piddled and crapped in their pants, they had a pretty good idea of the fate that awaited them.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)09:13 UTC+1 No.641375 Report

>>641349
I highly doubt you could see anyone's faces at that distance, and with the plane going at a decent fall speed.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)09:49 UTC+1 No.641399 Report

>>641375
Yeah if you were close enough to see into the windows, you'd likely either be dead or running for your life.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)09:50 UTC+1 No.641400 Report

>>641349
Ironically, if they'd had modern cameras in 1978, it probably would have been possible to see them in that photo.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)09:51 UTC+1 No.641401 Report

Blood splattered against the walls of a house
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)09:53 UTC+1 No.641403 Report

The pink thing looks like a passenger's clothing and that appears to be somebody's sheared-off hair/scalp in front of the fuselage.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)10:55 UTC+1 No.641423 Report

>>638944
>Perfect sense.
Agree one hundred percent, preoccupying yourself with the millions of potential threats to your life is completely pointless. If you are going to avoid seeing the world because of the chance of your plane crashing, that's just very silly. Do you live in a bunker, OP?
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)06:39 UTC+1 No.641833 Report

>>641403
>>641401
some of the accounts of that crash are pretty /g/ore-tastic. these were a few I found online:

"I was stationed at the US Navy base in San Diego in 1978, having first joined during the latter stages of the Vietnam War. When [the plane] went down, we were among those assigned to cleanup duty. One of the things that struck me the most was finding the head and shoulders of a middle-aged woman, sheared off just below the clavicles. She had pretty blonde hair and pearl earrings. Her eyes were wide open and her mouth agape, so I can well assume she was screaming on the way down. Death would have been instantaneous and there her final facial expression was frozen in place."


"I once met an old, retired captain who had flown for a number of airlines, finally finishing his career at United Airlines. Anyway, in 1978 he was working at Pacific Southwest, and he happened to be flying that morning in a different 727. He told me that he was following behind Flight 182, but missed the final transmission of the captain saying 'We're going down.' because he'd changed away from the radio frequency that the ATC station was on. Anyway, he touched down at Lindbergh Field and noticed a large cloud of black smoke off in the distance. Radioed the ATC to ask what was going on and they told him 'Your companion just blew up.' And he said 'What!?' and then he heard over the radio that a 727 had gone down. His reaction was like 'Oh my...god.'"
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)09:15 UTC+1 No.641863 Report

>>638935
>A handful of plane crashes in recent decades
>Too many car crashes to count in the past year

To answer your question, no.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)17:41 UTC+1 No.642017 Report

>>641401
>>641403
>>641833
Amazing.. I don't want to sound insensitive but these pictures and stories absolutely fascinate me. Are there any more? Or a link?
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)18:48 UTC+1 No.642033 Report

>>639007
>feeling up people's junk
That keeps you safe from testicular cancer.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)18:53 UTC+1 No.642034 Report

>>641079
While the respirator is running on Windows.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)18:55 UTC+1 No.642035 Report

>>641260
Sure it is. The 10,000m or so drop before on the other hand...

I'm kidding, anon: You'd be unconscious from the thin air, so you wouldn't feel anything.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)18:57 UTC+1 No.642037 Report

>>641355
That actually happens with most people after they died: Their muscles relax, and everything leaks out.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)19:08 UTC+1 No.642040 Report

>>641833
About that woman... Jesus Christ. That's going to haunt me now. I think I would be abusing drugs for years afterwards if I was part of the clean-up crew for that.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)19:17 UTC+1 No.642047 Report

>>642040
Here's hoping the cleanup crew had access to therapists.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)23:32 UTC+1 No.642151 Report

>>639149
Is it sick that I want to be one of the people searching planes after crashes now?
>>
Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)00:15 UTC+1 No.642183 Report

>>642151
I don't think it would be as easy as browsing gore on the internet, man
>>
Anonymous 03/27/14(Thu)00:32 UTC+1 No.642189 Report

>>639145
>"The cockpit crew's bodies were too badly fragmented to permit autopsy or toxicology tests."
How is that an understatement? Just because they don't dramatize the fuck out of it doesn't make it an understatement.
>"Lawdy lawdy, there was pieces of the pilot EVERYWHERE! The horror, oh the humanity!"
>>
Anonymous 03/28/14(Fri)18:06 UTC+1 No.642989 Report

>>642047
Apparently almost every first responder at the PSA 182 crash and many neighborhood residents had to undergo psychotherapy afterwards.
>>
Anonymous 03/28/14(Fri)18:33 UTC+1 No.642995 Report

>>641833
Another couple I found:

"I was on 182 that very morning en route to my state job. I boarded in Sacramento and sat in the right rear of the plane in the smoking section. As we got up in the air, I started feeling very uncomfortable and switched seats several times. During the approach to Los Angeles, the feeling of dread grew even stronger. I got off in LA and phoned my supervisor to inform them that I was taking a state car to the office in San Diego. So I headed down the highway and came into work. A few minutes later, somebody burst into the room to announce that I'd just been killed in a plane crash. As Mark Twain would say, 'The reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.'"

"As an aeronautical engineer, I once studied this crash to gain an understanding of the physics associated with fuselage compression and destruction. This was years ago, probably 1983 or so. But what I recall of the extreme compromise of the fuselage was that at one point, for approx. ten thousandths of a second, the actual fuselage was compressed to a length of approx. 17 feet, and a circle of approx. 11 feet, within this compressed tube, if you will, with an internal pressure inside that is immeasurable to modern instrument or any computer analysis possible, were the occupants of the plane. So this should give you some understanding as to the extreme mutilation of the passengers. Yes, it is true, four were found fully intact, which is almost inexplicable by physical standards. The rest were pulverized and dispersed, generally, to the left as stated earlier by a one-time contemporary of mine in this blog. That is quite true. In one instance, there was literally the face of one man fully fused into the back of the head of another, thus a two-faced head."
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