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File: burn-at-karner-blue-in-2008-courtesy-of-chris-hoving.jpg-(769 KB, 1024x768)
just finished my bi yearly...
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)00:45 UTC+1 No.290926 Report

just finished my bi yearly spring controlled burn

I burned 2 acres down of brush weeds and grass used my backhoe to cut in my firelines before the fire

how often do you burn your land?
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)00:48 UTC+1 No.290927 Report

Why
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)00:51 UTC+1 No.290931 Report

>>290927
because the brush chokes out the land I keep the big trees and the ash fertilizes the land
it also lowers the risk of forest fires by burning all the small stuff keeping fires from being able to reach the tree tops
its good forest management
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)00:55 UTC+1 No.290940 Report

>>290931
Agreed. Natural fire clearing brush led tohalthier forests before "Only you..." campaign and USFS TOTAL fire abatement program.

Cheers to op!

> Inb4 carbon tax.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)01:38 UTC+1 No.290977 Report

>>290940
USFS has actually been trying to steer away from the whole ONLY YOU slogan.
Problem with prescribed burns is that people who live in the middle of the woods complain about the smoke so it makes it really hard to get the go ahead for it.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)01:50 UTC+1 No.290987 Report

>>290977
Those are some niggas not enjoying the glorious smell of fire smoke.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)01:59 UTC+1 No.290996 Report
File: fire.jpg-(125x83)
>>290987Try tell that to...
>>290987
Try tell that to Sumatran & Malaysian.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)02:17 UTC+1 No.291007 Report

>>290987
Blame the people who want a trophy home in the woods and have no idea how to manage their land or what the environment needs.
Its funny too. The High park fire out in colorado had a fire prescription plan that was annually getting axed because they didnt want the smoke disturbing communities. And look what happened
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)02:18 UTC+1 No.291009 Report

>>290996
Thats a lot of dead and down though. That area needed it.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)02:23 UTC+1 No.291013 Report

>>291007
>no idea how to manage their land or what the environment needs.
you're the one over simplifying the situation and historical burning regimes
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)02:36 UTC+1 No.291019 Report

>>291013
No, not really. Random lightning strikes have always been the majority of starts, in NA prior to overpopulation.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)02:38 UTC+1 No.291020 Report

>>291013
oversimplying is needed. If you know how forest management works if you go out and start throwing technical terms they wont listen. Forests are treated as low priority by most states.
I also dont know why you brought up historical burning regimes. Those havent happened in the past 50-70 years
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)02:50 UTC+1 No.291026 Report

>>291020
because fires create spatial and temporal mosaics and recent push for back burning destroys those mosaics - everywhere gets burnt with one low intensity fire. it can have detrimental effects through the landscape

yeah its good to back burn in places; but its not a blanket need for most of the landscape
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)03:40 UTC+1 No.291041 Report

>>291026
Effn hippy fag.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)05:10 UTC+1 No.291067 Report

>>291019
I agree, there is no system in place that is proven today because the lightening - fire cycle evolved for millions of years before humans invented fire. An awesome weapon of mass destruction! Volcanoes probably caused their share of destruction and layering of ash.

Some people theorize the plains on the eastern side of the Rockies were once forested but I don;t believe there is any geological evidence for that until way long time ago when climate and continental drift would be factored in. That would be the Bakken formation and others farther east.
>>
Anonymous 03/23/14(Sun)06:10 UTC+1 No.291087 Report

>>291067

There is nowhere on earth which wasn't forested at one time or another. Even Antartica was a lush forest on the pole, before Australia moved away.

The tell in this case is the Rockies, which would interrupt the water cycle to the plains behind. Before tectonics lifted the mountains, there would have been the same climate as the other side.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)21:57 UTC+1 No.292053 Report

wow thanks op I just burned the field behind my house because fuck mowing it and I just got a 150$ ticket

the fire department came over 3 fucking hours after the fire was out to give me a ticket

if there really was a wild fire the entire woods would be on fire by that time fucking kikes should get a ticket for being so slow

the firefighters saw my firelines and said I did everything by the book except the permit then this cunt ass cop gives me a ticket
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)22:19 UTC+1 No.292065 Report

>>290926
My land? Rarely if ever.
We used to burn a section of my grandparents every year, really reduced the ticks around their property as well.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)22:20 UTC+1 No.292067 Report

>>290931
>it's good forest management
This.
Up here in minnesota there is so much shit down, because of a massive wind storm a few years ago, that it's all a huge fire hazard.
They're also whining about the amount of jack pine.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)22:23 UTC+1 No.292072 Report

>>292053
I remember when I was twelve.
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)23:36 UTC+1 No.292094 Report
File: 9-7713.jpg-(125x77)
I only burn down my neighbours...
I only burn down my neighbours land
just for the lulz
>>
Anonymous 03/24/14(Mon)23:39 UTC+1 No.292096 Report

>>292094
I'm more about salting the land, myself
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)12:08 UTC+1 No.292374 Report

>>292096
I prefer garlic powder.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)12:33 UTC+1 No.292377 Report
File: cantwealljustgetalong.jpg-(104x125)
>>292096>>292374
>>292096
>>292374
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)12:34 UTC+1 No.292379 Report

>>292096
>salting arable land

I hate you and everything you stand for
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)13:09 UTC+1 No.292392 Report

>>292379
the joke

your head
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)13:17 UTC+1 No.292395 Report

>>292377
"You got salt in my garlic powder!"
"You got garlic powder in my salt!"
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)13:41 UTC+1 No.292406 Report

>>292377
i sure hope that isnt refined salt
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)14:03 UTC+1 No.292408 Report

Only short prairie grasses out here, no reason to burn. Muleshoe NWR burns occasionally, but haven't had enough growth to need a burn in five or six years. We're in a long drought, seven or eight years, so even the tough prairie grass is thin.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)14:38 UTC+1 No.292416 Report

>>292408
What grass dominates the prairies? Doesn't burning them promote biodiversity?
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)17:39 UTC+1 No.292466 Report

I've always been curious: do you see any animals leaving the burn area during the burn? Snakes, rodents, birds, etc.?

I ask because I grew up in a neighborhood with a big forest behind it. They cut that forest down over the course of a few years, and in that process my neighborhood was like a zoo. Snakes everywhere, foxes moved in, box turtles, efc.. all cool to me because I loved seeing them.

But I've never seen such an influx of animals since then, so I attribute it to them moving away from the destroyed area.

Obviously it's common sense that wildlife will either leave or die in a burn/deforestation- but long story: do you see anything interesting leaving the burn area during/after?
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)18:51 UTC+1 No.292499 Report

>>292416
There are several types of grasses out here, mostly related to buffalo grass or fescue. Burning might promote diversity, but it's been dry enough (under 0.2" year to date, the last two years were the lowest consecutive year totals on record) that a fire would burn a million acres in about two minutes. Remember, dry grass is excellent tinder.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:21 UTC+1 No.292557 Report

>>292067
There are some endangered species like the Kirkland's Warbler that are dependent on Jack pine stands.

>>292416
>>292499

Aren't there invasives moving in (similar to creosote) the prairies because they are fire resistant...or was it the other way around? I vaguely remember some papers on the fire/lack of
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)21:35 UTC+1 No.292575 Report

>>292466
most small one have burrows they hide in during fires
before people started putting out wildfires they were pretty common
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)22:23 UTC+1 No.292616 Report

>>292557
Creosote and mesquite are both invasive here. Mesquite is tough as hell. Creosote is too far away to be a problem and isn't advancing AFAIK.
>>
Anonymous 03/25/14(Tue)23:18 UTC+1 No.292642 Report

>>291007
>Blame the people who... have no idea how to manage their land or what the environment needs.

I imagine the environment got along just fine before humans existed to set fire to it...
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)00:47 UTC+1 No.292706 Report

>>292642
yea it set itself on fire before humans started putting the fires out
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)09:38 UTC+1 No.292971 Report

>>290926
>I burned 2 acres down of brush weeds and grass
>why?
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)12:29 UTC+1 No.293001 Report

>>292971
>why?
Maintenance that mother nature would do if we left her the fuck alone to do it herself.

>>292499 here... it's raining! We might get as much as a quarter inch, which would more than double our year to date total. It's good timing, I'm planting the garden on Good Friday. Today is the only day with rain possibility in the forecast, though.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)14:14 UTC+1 No.293022 Report

>>292642
What are lightning strikes, Alex?

Either way though, think about if you had a river that flooded in your community, and that river was your vital lifeline to the rest of the world and food and supplies etc etc.

Now, this river is going to flood atleast 1 time a year. "sometime" in spring is all you know, but that's 4 months a year that you're sitting around going "Oh shit oh shit oh shit is all my stuff going to get destroyed? Am I going to ded? I hope everything isn't flooding....."

OR

You dig a small hole, divert the water, and cause a flood once yearly at the beginning of spring. Everyone gets together, enjoys the flood, doesn't fucking panic going "Oh fuck whens the flood going to happen?" for a whole damn season, the community gets the ecological benefits of the yearly flood (Rather than just damming the river) and everyone is happy, we've just made the flood work for us a little bit.


Same deal with forests with severe undergrowth, the small shit IS going to catch on fire, it's just a matter of when. So instead of sitting in your house waiting for mother nature to drop a fire bomb on your ass and have to run out of your house to haphazardly control an out of control fire, you cut some fire lines and have the equivalent of a big ass bonfire. It's a low heat fire (Provided you haven't let it go too long) so the large vegetation survives without a problem, and the nutrients help them further their growth.

Or you could have some brush choked hell hole of a tinder box waiting to catch in your back yard all year round.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)15:25 UTC+1 No.293035 Report

>>292466
Every so often if something like a fox is in the area it'll hop out.
>>
Anonymous 03/26/14(Wed)15:27 UTC+1 No.293036 Report

>>292557
Exactly, and they never let any areas burn, and they don't do near enough controlled burns.
Jack pines are much more rare now than even ~10 years ago.
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