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File: IMG_20131228_102710_482.jpg-(2 MB, 3264x1836)
what kinds of radios does...
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)18:42 UTC+1 No.283626 Report

what kinds of radios does /out/ use?
>>
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)18:52 UTC+1 No.283630 Report

LED flashlight, AM/FM/WEATHER, hand crank charger, solar charger, wall charger, cell phn charger, MP3/external audio input with weather alert standby mode.

Fucking love this thing!

Oh, you mean walkie talkies...
>>
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)19:01 UTC+1 No.283634 Report

>>283630
I have something like that too. its nice to have a radio to listen to going to bed, my uv5r can tune in on weather bands and FM radio stations too
>>
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)20:05 UTC+1 No.283663 Report

>>283626
A vx7r
>>
Mule 03/09/14(Sun)20:20 UTC+1 No.283670 Report

And a few others not pictured.
>>
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)20:29 UTC+1 No.283677 Report

I spilled my inch bag on the bed last night and did an inventory of everything I am impatiently waiting for the snow to melt so I can camp again.
>>
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)23:04 UTC+1 No.283740 Report

>>283630
Oh look twins.
>>
HammockMode 03/09/14(Sun)23:10 UTC+1 No.283743 Report

>>283740
is that a bag of kindling?
>>
Anonymous 03/09/14(Sun)23:15 UTC+1 No.283745 Report

>>283743
When I was splitting logs I made a few bags full of it to give out to my cousins who love to do arts and crafts.

Just kept a bag for myself for shits and giggles. Could be used for that I guess.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)00:01 UTC+1 No.283769 Report

HF:
Yaesu FT101EE
Heathkit DX40 transmitter
President Dwight D (AM-only CB)
Cobra 29 LTD Classic (AM-only CB)
Cobra 25 LTD Classic (AM-only CB)

VHF:
Yaesu FT270r (2m handheld)
Yaesu FT2600m (2m mobile)

UHF:
2 x Puxing PX888 (FRS/GMRS)
1 x Baofeng UV82R (FRS/GMRS)
Vertex FTL7011 (FRS/GMRS)
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)00:25 UTC+1 No.283784 Report

>>283740
>NOAA has it's own branded weather radio
Fuck NOAA is way cooler than Australia's BOM.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:02 UTC+1 No.283808 Report

>>283784
It's a very prolific network here in the US. I haven't been to many areas where it wasn't broadcasting clearly.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:04 UTC+1 No.283809 Report

>>283769
I have no idea what any of those switches do.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:18 UTC+1 No.283810 Report

>>283626
Grundig M400 at home, work, /out/, etc with 2 NiMH 'AAA's.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:24 UTC+1 No.283813 Report

>>283769
How's that tubemonster sound anyway? Tell me you don't use it on 11 meters.

Technically speaking I wouldn't call some of those /out/ radios, but they make my jimmies moist so no complaints. My non-/out/ radio is an icom 7000. I would like to take it out some day to run off a battery and use it as a qrp hf rig.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:24 UTC+1 No.283814 Report

>>283626

i have one of those in your picture OP.
of course i dont know how to program it or use it. so far just routinely pressing random buttons doesnt seem to be doing me any good.

anybody know sauce on a decent guide manula for these things?
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:25 UTC+1 No.283817 Report

>>283814
>buying a radio before researching exactly how to use it

No, I won't help you.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:27 UTC+1 No.283819 Report

>>283814
Download chirp and buy a programming cable, I'd advise to just transmit on MURS to avoid the hams ratting you out and the fcc cornholing you. There are a ton of youtube videos about that radio that are helpful
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:28 UTC+1 No.283820 Report

>>283817
I kind of agree but there's only so much to get familiar with until you have it in your hands to tinker with,
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:29 UTC+1 No.283821 Report

>>283769
>>283813
Actually it looks like it's tuned around....... 7.19xxxmhz then. Looks like it's not your high power cb radio after all. Sweet. Good radio.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:34 UTC+1 No.283822 Report

>>283819
spend a day googling shit and learning, I'm no expert but I know enough to use it correctly.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)01:37 UTC+1 No.283824 Report

>>283813
I only use it on 11 meters when I feel like being king of the air for 5 minutes.

I run a Behringer condenser microphone with a Behringer 802 mixer through a patch in through the landliner input. The hard part was the matching, since the impedance was different between the two outputs, plus the db input of the FT101EE was a LOT less than the db output of the 802.

It took some balancing, but I sound like pure sex on AM.

I mainly work extreme DX.

My record QSL is McMurdo station in Antarctica, KC4USV.

Short path is 9302 miles. 100 watts in to a 5/8 vertical on 10m on SSB. 5 by 9 plus signal both ways.

>>283809
It took me a week to learn how to use it properly. Worse yet, if you don't set it properly, you'll grenade the primary amplifier.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:38 UTC+1 No.283826 Report

>>283817

i watched tons of informative videos about it on YT and followed quite a few radio threads on this board for at least a year before i finally bought it.

i did research it quite a bit before hand to figure out which radio i really wanted and this was the one.
it came with a programming software bundle but the software doesnt run on my comp because it needs an older OS to run on.
I was counting on being able to program it through the software but now i guess i have to program it manually and i've never had a radio like this before so not sure where to even start
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)01:39 UTC+1 No.283827 Report

>>283821
File photo. not my transceiver, although mine is exactly the same. I'm the third owner. Second owner was a student who bought it for shortwave listening and realized it was overkill, first owner was the original.

Sadly, no accessories.

I picked up the matching Landliner speaker on ebay for likkeee $40...the internal speaker is absolute garbage.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:39 UTC+1 No.283828 Report

>>283824
Please elaborate.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:40 UTC+1 No.283829 Report

>>283819
>>283822

ok. thx.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:41 UTC+1 No.283830 Report

>>283828
On frying the amplifier
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)01:42 UTC+1 No.283831 Report

>>283809
Let's see:
Power - self explanatory
Heater - For the primary amplifying tubes. The radio is a hybrid from the 70s. It has a solid state receiver with a tube transmitter. Meaning, it's bulletproof. They yanked 2-3 of these out of Jonestown in South America in the aftermath. Heaters should be kept OFF when you're just listening to preserve the tubes. If you are going to transmit, you should turn on your heater at LEAST 60 seconds before transmitting. Longer is better.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)01:44 UTC+1 No.283833 Report

>>283831
I want to buy something like it to learn on. All the new tech seems too "simple".
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)01:55 UTC+1 No.283839 Report

>>283830
>>283828
Skipping to the topright:
Plate - This tunes the plate circuit of the primary amplifier.

Load - This tunes the output circuit of the pi network to match your antenna / feed impedance.

When adjusting, you should set the controls to a preliminary adjustment to whatever frequency you are operating on, then work from there. The figures are published in the manual, as well as around the dial.

CARRIER should be set almost minimum (This is from the days of AM... a blank "carrier" signal has your voice on top of it. However, you are transmitting carrier-only when adjusting the transceiver. The carrier is set low, so you have a low wattage output, thus creating less heat and less potential for damage), then the plate current needs to be dipped. Key the transceiver, causing it to transmit a signal. Then, you tweak the PLATE knob until you notice a dip in milliamps. If PLATE milliamps exceeds .100, the CARRIER must be reduced or damage can result.

LOAD should be set for whatever frequency you're on. This is usually between 3 and 5.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:02 UTC+1 No.283841 Report

>>283839
I forgot to mention, the meter needs to be on "IC".

For final tuning, switch the meter to PO (Power Output, basically, wattage).

Set CARRIER to 2.
Key up (MAX 10 SECONDS), and while holding the key, tweak PRESELECT for maximum meter reading. You will see a dip if you're too high or too low. Release key, wait 10-15 seconds for the amp to cool.

Key up, tweak LOADING for maximum meter reading. Wait to cool.

Key up, tweak PLATE for maximum meter reading. Wait to cool.

Go back to the CARRIER, increase to 4, repeat all processes again.

>repeat until CARRIER is at 10.

As you learn the radio, you will get fast at doing this. You DO NOT want to key up for a long period of time. Work quickly...when the carrier is at 10, you are transmitting at 100% duty cycle... I popped a tube on my DX40 after leaving it keyed up for about 40-50 seconds while I was trying to figure it out. Go slow, give it time to cool.

Once you're done, congrats, you're ready to transmit.

I also forgot to mention, the MODE knob needs to be on TUNE.

After final tuning, you can run SSB, AM, or CW. AM or CW require some additional tuning for the CARRIER. SSB (LSB or USB) requires no additional tuning.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:06 UTC+1 No.283844 Report

The plate is the anode inside a vacuum tube by the way.

When you are adjusting the PLATE knob, you are adjusting a variable capacitor that looks like a bunch of little aluminum discs that slide around other aluminum discs.

>The thing on the bottom with the knob is a variable capacitor
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)02:08 UTC+1 No.283846 Report

>>283841
I....what? Is this a HAM radio thing or a bomb?

[spoiler] I'm thinking about being a HAM, joining the local club, getting my cert and all that. [/spoiler]
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:14 UTC+1 No.283851 Report

>>283844
When you tweak the PLATE knob, you are changing the capacitance of the plate, so it is tuned properly to whatever frequency you are operating on. It is tough to explain in simple terms.

With LOADING, you are adjusting the load of the unit. A long time ago, it was decided that antennas will always present a 50 ohm load. However, that is in an ideal world. In the world we live in, we don't have millions of antennas cut for every single frequency. Plus, we sometimes cut antennas too long or too short. Sometimes the feedline has "leaks" in it, or a badly soldered connector. In any case, sometimes the load the the transceiver is 45 ohm or maybe 55 ohm.

To compensate, with this transceiver, you can slightly adjust the loading to compensate. If you were to operate a transceiver in to a load that was not 50 ohm without a matching circuit, you would create a mismatch situation, which can cause energy to reflect back in to the transceiver, blowing up the primary amplifier.

SOME reflected energy is acceptable, but it must be kept to a minimum.

The match is measured in SWR = standing wave ratio. 1:1 is perfect.

1:1.1 or 1:1.5 is an example of a well tuned antenna in the real world. 1:2.5 is a poorly tuned antenna. 1:5 can cause serious damage, 1:10 you're going to blow something up.

Vacuum tubes are more tolerant of a mismatch than solid state transistors are.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)02:14 UTC+1 No.283852 Report

>>283846
I should clarify: all this radio-talk seems like mumbo-jumbo.

If I wanted a radio that I could use instead of a cell phone when I travel to Mexico or camp in the desert, would getting a HAM licence and a handheld YAESU be enough if someone else in my home knew how to respond on another one?
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:21 UTC+1 No.283853 Report

>>283846
Notice the symmetry. It is from an amplifier circuit.

When you have a push-pull type amplifier, you can have 2, 4, 6...or more tubes! That one has 4. Symmetry is important so that all 4 tubes have the same "match". The impedance and inductance of the circuit must be exactly the same.

If the impedance or inductance is not the same, efficiency will be reduced. Damage to the tubes may result.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:23 UTC+1 No.283854 Report

>>283852
It's a dead art now.

These processes only hold true when utilizing a vacuum tube transmitter or transceiver.

Pretty much every transceiver made after about 1980 is solid state. No adjustments are required. Set frequency and key up. However, they are less durable and more sensitive to EMP. They are also not very easy to fix. My FT101EE has a very simple thruhole board layout that I can easily fix with a soldering pencil. The circuits are all analog with no digital chipsets being used.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)02:25 UTC+1 No.283855 Report

>>283854
Thank you for clarifying.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:26 UTC+1 No.283856 Report

>>283852
But, if you want to camp with a radio, I like the Yaesu FT897.

It has 100 watts when you needed. If you want to go portable, it has an optional battery pack, as well as a carry handle. You can lower the output to 5 watts and operate remotely for hours.

Utilizing NVIS (near vertical incidence skywave) antennas, I could guarantee reliable communications for up to about 200 miles or so. You could make the antenna out of some lamp wire quite easily... a balanced dipole is sufficient.
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)02:32 UTC+1 No.283860 Report

>>283856
This is a dipole antenna.

Ground goes one way, signal goes the other.

Ideally, you should feed the antenna with 300, 450, or 600 ohm twin-lead, then use a balanced line antenna tuner. But if you don't want to do that, you could use a dipole with standard coaxial cable feedline, then utilize your radio's internal "tuner" to achieve a match.

Achieving a 50 ohm load is still important. You will need either an internal tuner, or an external one. Internal tuners are automated and fast. External tuners typically are manual, but can take a greater mismatch...plus, I think they're easier. Although you can buy automatic external tuners now.

All the tuner does is take a load that is NOT 50 ohms, and let you dial it in so your transceiver "sees" 50 ohms. There is a drop in efficiency, but that is better than no transmission at all or having a damaged transceiver.

A VHF or UHF handheld is the easiest way to start. If there are local repeaters, your range can be HUNDREDS of miles, maybe thousands if it is a linked repeater system. Handhelds though, simplex? Radio-to-radio? They usually suck for that...couple miles, straight line, max.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)02:34 UTC+1 No.283862 Report

>>283856
I want one for the cabin I plan on building but I'll definitely have to get a license for that beast. I don't know why HAM and GMRS licenses are seperate.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:00 UTC+1 No.283872 Report

>>283824
I run this stack here with An audio-technica at2020 mic. Behringer tube ultragain 100 preamp just for the warmth and fuzzies that a tube can provide, even if im no expert with tubes. Dbx compressor and preamp to finish it off.

Nice pics btw, even if they are just pulled off Google.

For /out/ I definitely a going to pack out the ic7000 and run portable for some hot hot qrp action. In the meantime what bands do you run that tubemonster on, I would love to hear it some day

Kb3y**
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:03 UTC+1 No.283873 Report

>>283862
>>283856
897 will be quite fine. It would make an excellent cabin radio. Easy to hook up, small enough to take home with you, all band all mode. Get the ham license, it's very very easy to pass tech, general isn't bad either. Nobody gives a fuck about GPRS licensing except the people who actually paid for a license. Ham is more powerful anyway.

11 is fun, it's like the 4chan of radio. Lots of bullshit most of the time, but you can say whatever you want and it's totally anonymous.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:08 UTC+1 No.283876 Report

>>283860
I will also add that VHF simplex can be fun if you're into mountain climbing. When I went on vacation last year it's able to make contacts over 70 miles away on 146.52mhz using the vx7r in the picture i posted. In the thick woods? Not gonna happen. But if you got a clear line of sight anything is possible.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:13 UTC+1 No.283878 Report

>>283873
>11 is fun, it's like the 4chan of radio. Lots of bullshit most of the time, but you can say whatever you want and it's totally anonymous.
Kinda like 19 on the ol' CB.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:14 UTC+1 No.283879 Report

>>283878
Exactly. I couldn't listen to it ll day but occasionally a gem pops up once in a while.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:14 UTC+1 No.283880 Report

>>283878
Nevermind I realized CB was the 11 band.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:16 UTC+1 No.283883 Report

>>283876
how well does UHF fly through the forests?
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:28 UTC+1 No.283889 Report

>>283883
It's never going to be great. My girlfriend and I use Motorola ms350r UHF 2 watt radios and hey get us a reliable half mile in the forest, which is usually all we need. A baofeng with 5 watts and interchangeable antennas will do. Better, but not much better. I wouldn't trust most portable-to-portable operation innawoods past a mile or so anyway. If you have 30+ watts and an antenna high up you can do much much better. I've done 350 miles on VHF on 50 watts at the top of whiteface mountain, ny. It's all about the unobstructed line of sight.

Repeaters make most of these problems go away.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:34 UTC+1 No.283895 Report

>>283889
I have a similar pair of bubble packs too they're great for traveling in separate cars or for work.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:39 UTC+1 No.283897 Report

I'm a student way up on the 11th floor of a dorm. Terrain around campus is mountain-less. I want to listen to neat shit while in my room, was thinking shortwave. What's my best option?
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:41 UTC+1 No.283898 Report

>>283897
Program an HT for what campus security uses, Probably MURS. Maybe a CB if you're near the freeway.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:41 UTC+1 No.283899 Report

>>283897
Also, I have a AM/FM receiver-amp already, a desktop model to go with it would be ideal. I can fashion a proper antenna and run it out my window if I have to without issue.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:43 UTC+1 No.283900 Report

>>283898
A handheld would be fine, could double as my BoB item too. I'm not sure what campus police use.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:43 UTC+1 No.283901 Report

>>283897
Shortwave is a great option for listening to neat shit in your room. Skywave propagation isn't really affected by mountains or lack thereof.
If you invest money into a short wave radio, make sure it is SSB capable. You won't find this on any radios that cost less than $100, but if you spend more than that on a non-ssb radio you've wasted your money.

If you're not going to spend more than $100, then amazon has some pretty good shortwave receivers on the cheap. Last night we camped out and listened to shortwave on our $5 grundig "world radio" that we got used at goodwill.

Shortwave is an awesome thing to listen to, and can really add some flavor to your innawoods experience.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:47 UTC+1 No.283902 Report

>>283901
I was thinking Shortwave because of the wide range of stuff that uses it, and it's usefulness in certain situations if need be.

From what I understand SSB is a feature that makes an overall more efficient and effective radio?

Budget is probably $200 add or take 20.

I thought about getting one of those $40~ Baofeng handhelds, but I think that would be more suitable for purely backpack, while having a more powerful desk model for my room.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)03:51 UTC+1 No.283903 Report

>>283902
Ssb is a type of modulation that makes more efficient use of power in a narrower bandwidth. It makes your transmission go farther than AM. Its used mostly for communication traffic, not broadcast radio stations. Most ham radio, utility, and stuff like that use ssb. Most shortwave broadcast uses am. You probably won't get much of a transceiver (transmit and receive) for $200 but you can get a very excellent receiver for that price. You can hear some creepy shit on shortwave.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)03:54 UTC+1 No.283904 Report

>>283903
That's exactly what I'm going for. Listening to creepy shit from far far away and not transmitting, just listening. So with a shortwave, can I listen to CB or any other designated ranges?
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)04:37 UTC+1 No.283934 Report

>>283903
Pls respond.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)04:53 UTC+1 No.283945 Report

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/7256

What do you think of the Grundit Satellit 750?
>>
Radiofag 03/10/14(Mon)05:51 UTC+1 No.283969 Report

>>283904
If you get a receiver that covers 26.9 - 27.4 mhz, then yes, you can listen to CBers.

Warning : Their lingo is VERY hard to pick up.
>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uChI5DdoAnU
>"No Excuses on da' Bowl"
>Channel 6 AM = "CB Superbowl"...basically a huge power competition where people try to walk on top of each other.

Software defined receivers are getting popular. I highly recommend one.

>>283872
Most 10 meters, it offers the most excitement for me. I can have a 2-3 minute conversation with good dx with a fairly minimal antenna setup.

Basically though, everything except 80/75 and 160...80/75 is where all of the damn former CBers and old fuddy duddies hang out. Although I will listen in on the old AM nets occasionally...some of those old wideband broadcast transmitters sound NNIIICCEEE.

160, I don't have an antenna for it...hell, I don't have an antenna for 80/75.

I would love to experiment with 550m band someday...

Antennas:
5/8 vertical for 10/11m @ 35 ft AGL
40m dipole fed with twinlead @ 40 ft AGL

I suck at CW, so I run it through my computer. I do the same thing for PSK31 and RTTY. The 802 mixer makes it easy to input my laptop's speaker output.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)12:41 UTC+1 No.284142 Report

>>283945
It's a very fine radio, but a bit large for packing out. It listens to all shortwave frequencies, including cb. Very nice radio. Only problem is so large!!
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)15:35 UTC+1 No.284194 Report

Wouxun KGUVD1, UHF/VHF which is IP55 Dust and Water resistant and can be bought for about 80 dollars.

I power mine with 5AA rechargable batteries which are charged by a goal zero nomad recharger and battery pack.

As long as i have sunlight to recharge and dont drop it in water or down a crevice i always have a working radio.

There are better radios, such as some of the handheld yaesus which are fully waterproof for 30 minutes, but they start at 4 times the price.
>>
noko 03/10/14(Mon)16:58 UTC+1 No.284210 Report

>>283853

NO ONE GIVES A FUCK
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)17:14 UTC+1 No.284213 Report

>>283626
Technician here.
I have a UV5R but I am currently researching mobile and base stations.

>>283630
I have one of these multi-purpose radios in my truck. I've had to use the flashlight more than once. The radio is handy if you want a little news or music without running your engine.

>>283663
>>283769
Nice.

>>283814
For onboard programming, there are guides online, usually on forums or YT. I can program a repeater in on mine but you get rusty fast.

One or two repeaters aren't a big deal to input, but I strongly recommend a USB link cable and CHIRP software to program for heavy lifting.

>>283824
>extreme DX
Cool, man.

>>283852
Unless you camp close to home or can hit a repeater from your campsite, probably not. Some people make crazy contacts with 2m HT's and directional antennas, but a million factors can work against you. 2m HT's are absolutely awesome for members of a backpacking or river group, far better than FRS radio contact.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)17:56 UTC+1 No.284228 Report

>>283769
Callsign or die, fag.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)18:58 UTC+1 No.284260 Report

>>284213
>far better than FRS radio contact
aren't those limited to .5 watts which is barely good enough for a hundred yards in the depe woods
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)19:33 UTC+1 No.284288 Report

>>284260
Yep. FRS is limited to 500mW

I have been forced to use them while guiding large groups on 20+ mile hikes and they have maxed out on me at about 400 yards in thick woods, and just over 1 mile over open terrain.
>>
jeepguy/rfguy 03/10/14(Mon)19:44 UTC+1 No.284299 Report

>>284260
>>284288
>implying anyone actually runs 500mW
Most people use the hi power (2 watt) setting on their GMRS/frs bubblepack radios. Is it legal. Nope. Does anyone give a shit? Nope.

Pretty crappy radios either way.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)21:09 UTC+1 No.284324 Report

>>284299
Most of the bubble packs are hard wired to broadcast the frs only channels at 500mw. I know no one gives a fuck an I don't either. I feel pity and revulsion for some lonely faggot in his basement trying to fcc bomb a bunch of hikers and kids. Those types of people are the reason I don't get into radio as much anymore.
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)22:00 UTC+1 No.284363 Report

>>283663
>>283670
>>283769
>>283813
>>283819
>>283821
>>283824
>>283846
>>283854
>nostalgicfeelswithdad.jpg

God damn, this thread brings back childhood/adolescent memories of my license test, Field Day, logging contacts for my father during the VAQP (we ran mobile, had a pretty sick rig we put on the family suburban), trying to track the county changes in the N1MM logger, listening for CQs late into the night while munching on sunflower seeds... This brings me back. Shame I didn't stick with it, I lost interest in my early teens.

Pic related, it was an extended-exposure picture I took of stoplights or something on the way home after the VAQP ended one year
>>
Anonymous 03/10/14(Mon)23:01 UTC+1 No.284392 Report

>>284363
Any suggestions for someone about to take their test?
>>
Mule 03/11/14(Tue)00:26 UTC+1 No.284441 Report

>>284392
Take the practice exams online. The questions/answers are the same, but they'll shuffle the multiple-choice letters around. Remember the answers, not the letter.
What you see on the practice exams are -exactly- what you'll get from the VEC's.

AA9PW has a good one.

If you can pass those regularly, you'll be fine for the exams.
>>
Anonymous 03/11/14(Tue)01:04 UTC+1 No.284462 Report

>>284441
I only see myself using simplex and other short range communications, But the radios that are worth a damn require a license to use legally and I have seen on many forums that HAM's are extremely proactive in enforcing FCC laws to the letter. I don't really agree with people busting the balls of hikers and such on their 2 watt GMRS walkie talkies but it happens.
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jeepguy/rfguy 03/11/14(Tue)01:47 UTC+1 No.284488 Report

>>284462
Honestly you should just get a baofeng and program it for murs. Stay the fuck off the ham bands if you're not licensed, but if you run the baofeng at low power you will be legal, and you can put whatever antenna on there that you want. You would be surprised how much just changing the antennas out will improve your performance.
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Mule 03/11/14(Tue)01:53 UTC+1 No.284491 Report

>>284462
As long as you stay off ham bands you're fine. Hams are rather protective of their airspace.

FRS/GMRS... nobody gives a shit about that, till you start interfering with other users or hopping on repeaters. I've only ever heard one GMRS repeater, and most consumer-level radios don't even have the features necessary to use them.

For small-group radio comm, I like MURS/business radios. They're 2-watts VHF, radios are tough, and the band is pretty quiet. The downside to this is interoperability - when you hook up with another group, unless they happen to have the same radios and know how to program them, it's unlikely the two will work. I have a few that I use when it's just me and a few others - a good example is when I did a photo shoot in the mountains. The photog and crew didn't have any radios, cellular wouldn't work, and we didn't need comm with anyone else.

That's where FRS/GMRS rocks... The radios are cheap (inexpensive to buy $$, and "cheap" like chinese shit), but they're available at just about every store that carries sporting goods, and damn near everyone already has one or three of them. Since the freqs/tones are all standard, "channel 7" on one radio will work with "channel 7" on another. When i'm out snowmobiling, if we find another group that needs assistance they almost always have FRS/GMRS radios. Tell them "Hey, our crew's all on 7-7." Couple of keystrokes later, they're all talking to us (and us back to them) on their own equipment.

Even the other hams I ride with just park on an FRS/GMRS channel.
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Anonymous 03/11/14(Tue)01:58 UTC+1 No.284496 Report

>>284491
>have been considering modding!my ft7900 for mars/cap but haven't felt like opening it up......
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Mule 03/11/14(Tue)02:10 UTC+1 No.284500 Report

>>284496
Worth it.
Easy to do too.
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Anonymous 03/11/14(Tue)02:17 UTC+1 No.284503 Report

>>283873
Try tuning to 14.313 some day... That would be 4chan of 20M
-KK4GEQ
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Anonymous 03/11/14(Tue)02:21 UTC+1 No.284505 Report

>>283873
Lol 14.313 on occasions
I'd love to have an old boat anchor like that one day *dreamy look in the eyes*
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Anonymous 03/11/14(Tue)02:25 UTC+1 No.284508 Report

>>284503
>>284505
>posting your entire callsign on 4chan
14.313 is a hoot to listen to. I have not ever worked up the nerve to key up on that freq though.
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)00:16 UTC+1 No.286418 Report

>>284508
How much is a 20m receiver?
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)01:14 UTC+1 No.286449 Report

>>283626
Chinese made ones
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)05:07 UTC+1 No.286586 Report

>>286449
Are you trying to be insulting? Most of us started out with that radio.
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)05:29 UTC+1 No.286593 Report

>>286586
Do you know of any non Chinese made ones?

It's like somehow i trolled you by accident
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)05:31 UTC+1 No.286594 Report

>>286593
Not buttflustered was honestly not sure, I believe the higher end HT's are Japanese which is also Chinese kind of.
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Mule 03/15/14(Sat)06:48 UTC+1 No.286623 Report

Picked up a 2nd battery for my FT60 today. Batt that came with the radio (bought it ~6 years ago) is starting to fade... only goes 4-6 hours of moderate use before the light turns on.

I spent more money on a battery for that radio than I did for my entire Baofeng setup.... radio+battery+antenna, charger, and earphone/mic.

The chinese radios aren't a bad value for the price, but if you want a *good* radio, be ready to pay for it.
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)10:30 UTC+1 No.286656 Report

Hey guys. I used to have a cb radio over 15 years ago, had a massive Ariel strapped to my house on a scaffold pole! I'm thinking of getting a cb for the van or possibly a hand held that will double up as a van cb too (run off van battery's, plug into a bigger Ariel, and can use a handheld mic. What would be a good set up or radio for this pls?
Also can you get any decent flat Ariels so I don't have to mount a massive whip on my van?
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)12:15 UTC+1 No.286684 Report

>>283969
Holy shit, a CD Gonset communicator! Those are my favorite! I need to add one to my civil defense collection
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Anonymous 03/15/14(Sat)13:53 UTC+1 No.286704 Report

>>283626
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)00:11 UTC+1 No.288322 Report

Looking for a good set of /out/ recommended walkie talkies.
I've never had a set that lasted very long.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)19:50 UTC+1 No.288722 Report

>>288322
Depends on what you want to do.
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rfguy 03/18/14(Tue)20:40 UTC+1 No.288738 Report

>>288322
Motorola ms350r are good enough for most casual hiker/camper/geocachers. They are rechargeable and have a built in flashlight.

If you think you may want to become a ham, baofengs are good and cheap, but not anywhere near as foolproof as the motorolas.
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rfguy 03/18/14(Tue)20:41 UTC+1 No.288739 Report

>>288738
Waterproof and they float also. We use them when kayaking and canoeing without fear that they may drown.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)20:53 UTC+1 No.288741 Report

>>288738
I agree, For hiking and general close range comms The higher tier bubblepack GMRS/FRS radios are perfect.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)20:56 UTC+1 No.288743 Report

>>288741
The baofeng can use those channels as well but you're not supposed to, Just make to stay off GMRS repeaters if you don't have a callsign and to make sure no elmer ham aspies go through your camping gear while you're sleeping and you'll be okay.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)21:36 UTC+1 No.288757 Report

>>288722
I usually go /out/ with 1-2 other people
I just want to be able to keep communication if one of us stays at the camp, or we split ways to do something. Doesn't need to be super long range.

>>288738
>>288739
>>288741
Thanks, I'll look into those!

>>288743
I may look into ham stuff down the road, but for the time being, I want to keep it simple.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)21:42 UTC+1 No.288761 Report

>>288757
I have a pair of 2watt cobra GMRS/FRS radios that can also listen to the NOAA channels. They are also rechargable. The model is cxt595. They might be just what you're looking for. They have them for sale at walmart for like sixty.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)21:44 UTC+1 No.288765 Report

>>288761
That 32 mile range label is bullshit though, You might get one mile in the woods if you're lucky, 32 miles might be realistic if you're inside a vaccuum from mountain top to mountaintop.
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Anonymous 03/18/14(Tue)21:52 UTC+1 No.288772 Report

>>288757
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Anonymous 03/19/14(Wed)02:17 UTC+1 No.288928 Report

>>288772
What are those? 100mw FRS?
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Anonymous 03/19/14(Wed)20:37 UTC+1 No.289290 Report

>>288772
>>288928
aha-ahahaha
I might actually need those if I go camping with my sister. She is completely tech-tarded.
If it has buttons on it, she can fuck it up...
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