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/trv/ - Travel

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Anonymous 06/30/14(Mon)21:01 UTC+1 No.866356 Report

Englishman here who visited America for the first time last month (and loved it.) Travelling there has given me a thirst for seeing more of the world and for some reason, one of the countries high up on my list is Turkey. Anyone ever been or worked there and can shed some light on what it's like for a foreigner? Any Turks care to explain what life is like there?
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Anonymous 06/30/14(Mon)21:22 UTC+1 No.866361 Report

Volunteered in a hostel in Istanbul for 3 weeks, it's a great city.
The rest of the country is different though, more Muslim and conservative, but people are still open, volunteered on a farm in the middle of the country
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Anonymous 07/01/14(Tue)01:00 UTC+1 No.866421 Report

>>866361
Sweet. Sounds good. Thanks man.
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Anonymous 07/01/14(Tue)03:15 UTC+1 No.866458 Report

I lived in Istanbul for about 9 months in 2010. Not even kidding, my apartment was about 100 feet from where this photo was taken (Ortaköy Square). I taught English for a company called English Time, which wasn't a particularly good school but was tolerable. Made pretty decent money, and some good Turkish and foreign friends. I have a ton of recommendations for Istanbul and the rest of the country, which we spent about five weeks traveling around. As an earlier poster said, it is more conservative elsewhere, but not necessarily in a negative way--it's something different. Foreigners are very welcome, even in the most Muslim areas.

Some recommendations off the top of my head: Istanbul, Cappadocia, Pamukkale, Ephesus, paragliding in Oludeniz, Butterfly Valley, Mt. Nemrut, Sanliurfa, and Mardin.
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Anonymous 07/01/14(Tue)03:48 UTC+1 No.866470 Report

>>866356
It's an oddly good second choice. Let the Turks display their parochial pride as you did with the Americans and you'll have a good time.

At the fruit stand the guy isn't selling lemons and cherries, but Turkish lemon? Turkish cherry?

Inquire of anyone doing anything "cultural" in public view and you'll be instantly be the guest of honor at the music or dance recital.

tl'dr Turks like Americans are both proud and demonstrative -- egg both on and join in for maximum fun.

But never believe a Turkish cabbie.
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Anonymous 07/01/14(Tue)20:06 UTC+1 No.866753 Report

>>866458
>>866470

Thanks guys, sounds like a great place! Did you have to learn Turkish before going over there to teach English?
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Anonymous 07/02/14(Wed)01:30 UTC+1 No.866861 Report

>>866753
I didn't learn any in advance of going and I didn't study it seriously while I was there, just picked some up from friends and students and a guidebook. From what I understand it's a relatively easy language to learn (compared to Arabic, for example), but if you're just visiting for a short holiday there's no need to pick up anything but the barest pleasantries, or numbers and prices for the purpose of haggling and getting better deals/silly interactions.
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)01:10 UTC+1 No.867331 Report

>>866861
Nice one. Thanks man!
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)01:42 UTC+1 No.867342 Report

>>866356
What did you love about USA? I'm American, just curious.
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)11:45 UTC+1 No.867510 Report

>>866356
Hey, great to know you're interested in our little part of the world.

It's an easy life for most foreign men, we tend to be really interested in tourists and if you've got a good head on your shoulders then you won't have much to worry about.

People tend to be affectionate and usually nosy, so that might seem odd at first. We like touching people but it's rarely sexual. I add that because after years of living abroad then coming back home, I freaked out about everyone touching me.

You'll probably be coming to Istanbul - huge city. I think the only place in the UK that can really compare is London and even that seems civilized. Always a new place to go to, very easy to make friends. The traffic is horrible though. Like it takes me about an hour or two to meet up with friends without a car. Public transport is abundant, so at least that's a plus.

The food is amazing, never seen a foreigner complain about the food. Great meat dishes, even better vegetarian options (when you can find them) and if for some reason you get sick of it, plenty of international cuisine to chow down on.

Depending on where you go the climate can change drastically. Istanbul is warm and slightly windy atm, it's usually sweltering this time of year though. When living in Manchester my main complaint was the lack of seasons. No such thing here, you'll feel all of the seasons in full force.

Not sure what else to add, any questions?
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)13:40 UTC+1 No.867542 Report

>>867510
How's the prostitution scene in Turkey?
Just curious.
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)14:04 UTC+1 No.867555 Report

>>867542

Well, not what I was expecting.

Here's my limited knowledge on the subject.

There are government owned brothels, so it's legal to a certain extent. However, from what I know, if a prostitute were to practice their trade anywhere else, it would be illegal.

If a prostitute were to entertain in an hotel room without being bound to the government, and if police were to raid the hotel room or whatever, then she would be forced to work for the government. In case you were wondering, the people who work in legal brothels are not technically the kind of girls you would go for. They're often middle aged women who service 20 to 60 men a day. We have had prostitutes showing up at the hospital to get cum cleaned out of them as the amount caused them pain. Not that you need to worry about that, as you need to be a Turkish citizen to enter, with strict ID checks happening by the gates with police doing the checking.

Now I've heard of Slavic, mostly Russian prostitutes working, and I've heard that they can be rather attractive, but I've got no clue how you could contact one.

There are ads for local prostitutes here and there, some on facebook (they set up profile pages for themselves), but who knows what'll happen if you were to visit one of them.

Some of them you can pick up from the street, the most common areas are on the streets parallel to Istiklal Avenue (with a brothel nearby). They tend to be transwomen, who will fuck you up if you insult them. Known to carry blades on them. Most of them are real sweethearts though, and they have places nearby you can go to.

And one last thing, while this isn't enforced like before, there was a law stating that only married couples could stay in a hotel room together. This just applies to lower end hotels at the moment but there's a chance that if you go to a shady hotel they might just call the police on you and your lady(?) friend.
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)14:05 UTC+1 No.867556 Report

>>866470

Lel, spot on.

>>866356

Just came back from living over there for a year and teaching English. You won't find it hard to find a job here but you'll likely be working illegally and without a work permit if you don't have a CELTA/recognised teaching qualification. I never made any effort to study the language when I was there but I was able to pick enough up to get along and have basic conversations with people. Foreigners are very welcome but Turks are very patriotic and you'll have to indulge them and your students if you end up teaching even if the things they say are just completely wrong.

I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you have or give any recommendations for places. I was working in Istanbul but you might want to see about working in Izmir, it's much more laid back.

>>867542

Judging by the amount of Russians/Moldovans being guided through the residency permit by shady looking Turkish gentlemen, it's booming. I don't know much about it but apparently the Aksaray district is a hotspot for it.
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Anonymous 07/03/14(Thu)14:32 UTC+1 No.867560 Report

>>867556
What did you get paid to teach English there?
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Anonymous 07/05/14(Sat)17:50 UTC+1 No.868275 Report

>>867342
Just found the people really welcoming and friendly. Weather was nice, interesting things to see and generally a good atmosphere. I was very sad to leave.
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Anonymous 07/05/14(Sat)17:54 UTC+1 No.868277 Report

>>867556
>>867510
Thanks guys! Very informative. I like the idea of going to Turkey the more I hear about it. I've got no problem indulging people when it comes to nationalism, like I said, I got on fine in America lol.

Wasn't me that asked about the prostitution by the way. Getting laid isn't a priority for me.
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Anonymous 07/05/14(Sat)18:03 UTC+1 No.868279 Report

>>867556
>>867510
Oh and while I think of it, do either of you know much about the football culture over there? I know a fair bit about the history of Turkish football but all I've seen about the modern game is from programmes about football hooligans.
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Anonymous 07/05/14(Sat)20:11 UTC+1 No.868314 Report

>>867510
Given that Syria and Iraq are right next to Turkey, I have to ask if the conflicts going on there have any effect on Turkey? Is there any tensions going on there right now?
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Anonymous 07/05/14(Sat)20:20 UTC+1 No.868317 Report

>>868314

Just like drug cartel killings in Mexico don't affect life in New York, the conflict in the Middle East should have zero effect unless you are living right near the border for some reason.
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Anonymous 07/05/14(Sat)20:28 UTC+1 No.868319 Report

>>868279

OK, as a Turk expat, this is probably my favorite subject to talk about. Even though Turks don't want to admit to it, most of the "hooligan" moniker is fake for intimidation purposes, stories of boat full of fans with switchblades and flares blindly attacking people just does not happen. Does it work, absolutely; pretty much every foreign footballer mentions how the atmosphere will be the worst of their lives. We just never shut up and light a few flares if we are in the mood, I'd say Turkish football fans are a lot less violent than fans in the Balkans or South America.

Can you go to any game with zero concern of something happening to you? The answer is yes, except for a single game; Galatasaray vs. Fenerbahce. Nothing will or can happen to you if you simply enter the stadium, sing and have fun; but if you are planning to go out to a bar where the hardcore fans usually gather (for Galatasaray these places are in Nevizade, for Fenerbahce it's Kadikoy), there is a chance that you can say something wrong and end up with a beautiful Glasgow smile on your face. You really have to try though.

The quality of the football played however is another thing, I don't think you would want to go to a Turkish football game unless the "three greats" as we call it are playing.
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)01:39 UTC+1 No.868413 Report

>>868319
Yeah I figured Galatasaray, Fenerbache and Besiktas (sp?) Would be the best teams to watch. Maybe Trabzonspor or Bursaspor too.

Sounds more or less the same as here then. Still hooligans about but most of them in the media. Thanks man.
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)15:38 UTC+1 No.868604 Report

>>866356
Turkish guy here, who travelled to many cities in Turkey and lived in Istanbul for 23 years. Ask anything.
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)16:30 UTC+1 No.868617 Report

>>866356
Just got back from Istanbul 5 days ago, it's a tremendous place. My girlfriend wasn't that keen on it but I loved it.
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)16:42 UTC+1 No.868619 Report

>>868604
Is there any particular cities to avoid? What would you recommend to do in Turkey?

>>868617
Cool. Any reason why she wasn't keen on it?
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)16:55 UTC+1 No.868620 Report

>>868619
I guess a primary difference is that the men in Istanbul can be somewhat forward and really stare at women. Nothing threatening at all but I guess it could get a bit annoying. The other thing is that it is definitely crowded with 20 million people.

That being said the crowds and the madness of the city was fantastic for me. I loved the chaos. I can recommend some fantastic restaurants for you if you'd like. It also depends on your budget.
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)17:11 UTC+1 No.868622 Report

>>868620
Haven't worked out a budget or anything yet but if you can recommend some good places to eat and such then please do and I'll make a note of them.
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)17:26 UTC+1 No.868625 Report

>>868622
No worries. We stayed in a furnished apartment near the Beyo?lu region which has some great roof-top bars, restaurants and little side alleys to get lost in. It's also a short metro ride to Taksim Square and a short ride plus a bit of a walk to the Blue Mosque and Hagia Sofia.

The first night we ate at a place called Münferit. A meal for two with two appetizers, two main courses, 3-4 glasses of wine and desert with tip was around 200 TL, which is the equivalent of around 65 Euros. The food is well prepared, produce is fresh, and staff is friendly and helpful.

On a later evening we went to a restaurant called Meze which was really unique and my girlfriend's favourite. If you order a meal for two it's basically 165 TL (50 Euros) but the amount of food you get is staggering. 5 cold starters, 1 hot starter, 2 main meals and tea/coffee/espresso. Wine is a little bit more but the food is fantastically prepared. Book a reservation in advance for this place. They have all of the large windows open in the summer which creates a great atmosphere.

Our very last meal (of note) was at a rooftop restaurant called Mikla. This was by far our priciest meal but we were celebrating a bit and the rooftop view of the city is absolutely stunning. I'll attach a few photos later when I upload them from my camera. Dinner was around 420 TL including tip which provided us with a high quality three course meal with wine and appetizers. The chef who cooks is Turkish-Swedish and the beef is awesome!
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)17:28 UTC+1 No.868626 Report

>>868625
We also went for a couple of quiet drinks at a roof-top bar Palazzo Donizetti hotel. Watching the sun set around 8:30 is a beautiful experience. The gin and tonic is the best I had in the city as well.

I really hope that you enjoy Istanbul, I was only there for 5 days but even that short period was massively enjoyable. Best of luck in your future travels!
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Anonymous 07/06/14(Sun)18:38 UTC+1 No.868636 Report

>>868626
>>868625
Good stuff. Thanks a lot man. I'll definitely check them out if I go.
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Anonymous 07/07/14(Mon)02:16 UTC+1 No.868824 Report

>>868604
Are the police as corrupt as their reputation makes tyem out to be? There seems to be this image, probably started by the film Midnight Express, of the Turkish police being total bastards.
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Anonymous 07/07/14(Mon)02:53 UTC+1 No.868841 Report

>>868824
yes they are!
but as a foreigner you would be treated more kindly.
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Anonymous 07/07/14(Mon)03:40 UTC+1 No.868863 Report

>>868841
Damn. Even so, I'll watch myself when I go to Turkey then. Thanks for the heads up.
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Anonymous 07/07/14(Mon)15:09 UTC+1 No.869069 Report

>>868619
I would recommend big cities, Mediterranean part and famous historical places. Otherwise you might get into travel. Even in the places that recommended, stay away from poor suburbs.

Other than that, watch scam city Istanbul on youtube. Be careful about such people.

Feel free ask more.
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Anonymous 07/07/14(Mon)15:11 UTC+1 No.869070 Report

>>868824
As a foreigner you won't have so many problems, unless you are rude to them. Most of them don't know English, but they will try to help you if you are kind.
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Anonymous 07/07/14(Mon)18:40 UTC+1 No.869162 Report

>>866356
>Turk here
>Visit either touristic places or big cities
>Do not go to slums or poor places
>Do not visit east-south-east of turkey there are terrorists there.
>Good cities are: bodrum, çe?me, izmir.
>Also this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cappadocia
>Conventional Turks people are rooted with their tribal social values, they dont like insults and overjoy(partying or screaming etc.). They can be extremely religious or nationalist but you wouldnt see them if you dont visit bad places.
>Modern Turks are like european people except with more tribal social values, they value social bonds. They look like normal people in your own country.
>Turkey is going through a division period right now so there can be riots in ?stanbul or east-south-east Turkey.
>Some Turkish people are helpful and kind while others just see tourists as fuck-dolls, so dont swim naked in less crowded places.
>Dont think law works in Turkey as in your country, dont get into fights or arguments with people thinking they will stand and shout arguments at you as if its US, turks resort to violence in heated arguments especially in politics and religion.
>Rest is up to you and your taste of taking risks.
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Anonymous 07/09/14(Wed)00:58 UTC+1 No.869951 Report

>>869162
>>869069
Thanks guys. I'm not a woman and not American so keeping my mouth shut and clothes on isn't an issue ;) Thanks for the warnings about certain areas and scam artists though.
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Anonymous 07/09/14(Wed)18:36 UTC+1 No.870208 Report

>>869162
How frequent are riots in Istanbul? Di they get particularly bad or they more like a typical football riot?
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Anonymous 07/09/14(Wed)18:51 UTC+1 No.870211 Report

>>869162

>i am a western turk and i have never actually been to eastern turkey

kek/10
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Anonymous 07/10/14(Thu)03:12 UTC+1 No.870444 Report

>>868314
There are many Syrian refugees in Istanbul and they might stab you to dead for 1 lira.
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Anonymous 07/10/14(Thu)04:39 UTC+1 No.870457 Report

>>869162
wat

Bodrum is an awful tourist town, Izmir much the same. The SE is fine, save for a few border regions in the extreme SE. Most Turks never go anywhere near that if they're from Istanbul.

>Dont think law works in Turkey as in your country, dont get into fights or arguments with people thinking they will stand and shout arguments at you as if its US, turks resort to violence in heated arguments especially in politics and religion.

Bro, have you seen US news lately?
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Anonymous 07/10/14(Thu)18:37 UTC+1 No.870672 Report

>>870457
Again, I'm not American. He's right insofar that in England, it's unlikely to have a stabbing over politics or religion. Everything else though...
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